The Bleeding Arch

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE IN THE GROUP TO ACCESS THE GALLERY, ANY MEMBER OF WHICH MAY BE VIEWED FULL SIZE BY SCROLLING DOWN AND CLICKING BOX AT BOTTOM RIGHT. FURTHER ENLARGEMENT MAY BE OBTAINED WITH A CLICK OR TWO

Jackie spent much of the day on giving the Rose Garden a thorough Autumn Clean. This involved extensive weeding, clearing all the paths, sweeping, pruning, thinning out, and dead heading. All the refuse was then carried to the Orange Bags for eventual transmission to the dump. Reducing the heucheras produced numerous plants for transplanting elsewhere. I rendered minimal assistance. The background paths and soil in these photographs is as worthy of perusal as the flowers.

Naturally, we took this evening’s pre-prandial potations in this space where, earlier, I had not noticed how the Ace Reclaim arch bled for Crown Princess Margareta.

This evening the three of us dined on Jackie’s splendid pork paprika; super savoury rice; al dente mange touts; and sautéed peppers, onions and mushrooms. Mrs Knight drank Hoegaarden and Elizabeth and I consumed more of the Fleurie.

 

53 thoughts on “The Bleeding Arch

  1. The rustic look goes well with the theme of the garden and the Head Garden (Mrs Knight) always knows the right place to put the various relics. Have you started on any ideas of what will be grown in the hot house?

    • Do you mean the greenhouse? It is not (unfortunately) ‘hot’, non the less, I am already taking cuttings of Pelargoniums, for the pots and hanging baskets for next years displays. I have cuttings of hydrangeas, and persicarias as well as loads of Heuchera cuttings! It will also over winter all my more tender plants, and in Spring I will start seeds off in there. So although it is a cold greenhouse it still is SO useful. J

      • My apologies, Jackie, yes I meant greenhouse. You are well prepared! I did not know hydrangeas were propagated by cuttings.

  2. You treat us to so many beautiful photos on a regular basis that we come to expect nothing less, and then you give us one like this that is simply stunning, really reminding the reader that the composition may have been formed by Mother Nature (with help from the Head Gardener, of course) but it takes the eye of the photographer to put it in a frame.

  3. I think the arch is beautiful! And Jackie did an amazing job…lots of hard work! Everything looks clean and lovely and gorgeous! 🙂
    Your photos always remind me to stop and smell the roses (and other flowers!)! 🙂
    HUGS!!! 🙂

  4. Such a beautiful garden and while the head gardener works, you do your part by documenting the process so splendidly. How could you resist having your “pre-prandial potations” there–followed perhaps by a post-prandial perambulation around the paths again? 😉

  5. Fabulous. If my garden looks anything like yours in a couple of years I will be so pleased. I won’t plant roses though, I don’t especially like roses. I do like the rusting iron, it needs a coat of paint of course but that will spoil it!

  6. My first thought when I read your title reminds me of a mistake in a student’s essay I’ve just marked: ‘flipping classroom’ instead of ‘flipped classroom’. Anyway, I will now enjoy reading your blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.