The Leap

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(YVONNE SPOILER ALERT. THE RECIPE IS NOT YET READY, BUT YOU MAY WISH TO AVERT YOUR EYES FROM THE FINAL PARAGRAPH)

Lamb Inn

Late in the morning Jackie drove us to Nomansland where we lunched in the Lamb Inn.

Even at midday, ponies on the green outside dined on defrosted food, avoiding the refrigerated options.

In the hostelry, beside a fine log fire, and beneath a display of character jugs, I enjoyed a burger, chips, and Doom Bar beer; while Jackie chose a bacon, brie, and cranberry baguette with coffee.

Horse and rider

As we drove away, we passed a rider who led her steed through the gate to her left.

At St Peter’s Church, Bramshaw, the autumn leaves blended well with the groggy lichen-covered  gravestones, mostly dating from the eighteenth century. Steep steps lead up the hill from the roadside; there is also a slope to the side, no doubt for those parishioners who cannot climb.

St Peter's Church wall

Most of the structure seemed to be Georgian in date, although one stone wall looked older,

Chimney

and I am not enough of an architectural historian to date this fascinating chimney.

Hedge cutting

Thinking it unlikely that the Modus would obstruct anyone, Jackie tucked it in beside the church. She was unlucky. Along came a hedge cutting machine.

Pony jumping

We paused at Wootton so I could photograph a couple of ponies drinking from a stream. As I raised my camera, one leaped from the water to the bank above.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s luscious liver casserole, crunchy carrots and green beans, with creamy mashed potato. She drank sparkling water and I drank Collin-Bourisset Fleurie 2015.

Dawn Over The Isle Of Wight

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This morning my muse woke me with a start and uttered something about catching Dawn. What had Dawn done? I wondered. And who was she, anyway? Then it dawned on me. This was an invitation to watch a pink sky over the Isle of Wight. I prised myself out of bed, staggered into some clothes, and joined Jackie who was engaged in defrosting the car windscreen.

Down Downton Lane we hurtled, and came to an abrupt halt in the nearest coastal car park. I kept my eyes open long enough to operate the camera and totter back into the car.

The single baleful eye of The Needles lighthouse gave the impression that the Loch Ness Monster had moved house, and a solitary gull was up early.

This afternoon we shopped at Odd Spot in Burley

Forest road

then went on driveabout. The oaks

Longmead farm

opposite Longmead Farm have all but lost their leaves now.

Horses in rugs

Horses in the field now wear their rugs,

Sow

and a vast snuffling sow wandered out to investigate my activities.

Our return trip took us along Rhinefield Ornamental Drive.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s classic liver casserole, mashed potatoes,  crunchy carrots and green beans. I drank water, and Jackie didn’t.

The Nightingale

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Today Jackie drove me to and from New Milton for my trip to London to visit Luci and Wolf.

I travelled from Waterloo by the Northern Line Underground to Clapham South.

Luci met me at Costa Coffee opposite the station

and drove me to The Nightingale for lunch. This characterful Victorian pub still sports the etched windows of the period.

We both enjoyed fish, chips, and mushy peas. I drank Doom Bar, whilst Luci drank a pleasant non-alcoholic beer. I had no need for further sustenance this evening.

Giving Wolf time to complete his own lunch in the rather splendid care home that is Nightingale House, we visited him first in his well-appointed room, then for tea in the establishment’s cafe. The couple showed me Wolf’s photograph book containing top quality prints made by my friend’s son Simon.

Derrick and Wolf c2009

I share one page with Wolf. Luci took this photograph c2009.

pork-paprika-recipe001pork-paprika-recipe002

In the meantime Jackie produced a recipe for her Pork Paprika, as requested by our friend Jessie. I sent this on to the intended recipient.

 

Xmas Show

 

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This morning I made some prints for Christmas presents, before visiting Margery and Paul at:

Xmas show brochure

This ever popular exhibition did not disappoint in its array of art works in different media, reasonably enough priced to make for good, unpressurised Christmas shopping.

Clown cushion

Margery’s own charming clown cushion makes a good start.

SnailsLucille Scott’s snails would decorate any garden.

Necklaces

There is much good jewelry on a par with these necklaces.

Deborah Richards’s ceramic sculptures are a highlight.

Hare wire picture

I liked Ruth Facey’s wire pictures.

Lounge Lady

Rita Rouw’s Lounge Lady, reflecting the note of humour in the exhibition, has an air of Beryl Cook.

Cock and cats

The cock and cats at the top of the stairs seems a happy juxtapostion.

Monkey linocut

On the way up are a row of Josephine Sumner’s colourful linocuts,

Fish string

opposite which are strings of fish.

Picture and tea set

The contents of this shelf in the kitchen may or may not be for sale. Whether or not, they are examples of the objects around this home that display the best part of a century’s fascination with all forms of creativity.

There is still another week in which to visit the show.

We spent that afternoon with Elizabeth and Mum in turn at their respective homes in West End.

Christmas lightsway home we noticed that a number of the small towns, like Lyndhurst, have switched on their Christmas lights.

There was enough of yesterday’s Indian takeaway for, with the addition of onion bahjis, second helpings this evening. Jackie drank Hoegaarden, and I finished the madiran.

Watching

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Today was pretty murky. This morning, through the window I watched blackbirds feeding on crab apples. They generally dropped the fruit onto the ground, flew down and ate them where they fell.

This afternoon and early evening was spent watching rugby on T.V.

First came Scotland (in striped shirts) v. Georgia (in red).

Wales (in red) v. South Africa (in green) was to follow.

Finally we had England (in dark blue) v. Argentina (in blue and white stripes).

Any text would be in danger of spoiling. That lets me of the hook.

Jackie collected a takeaway meal from The Raj in Old Milton for ou evening meal. She drank Hoegaarden whilst I drank Reserve des Tuguets Madiran 2014. My main meal was naga prawn with special fried rice; we shared poppadoms, pooris, paratha, and sag bahji.

 

In A Different Light

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The car was repaired this morning and passed its M.O.T. test whilst it was at it. We therefore celebrated with a drive to Keyhaven and back.

Barnes Lane

The outward trip was via Barnes Lane and Milford on Sea.

The tide was far out. Without water on which to float, the damaged boat, Blue Dawn, lurched even more than it had a couple of days ago.

Hurst Castle, its lighthouse, and the recumbent hulk that is the Isle of Wight were all more clearly visible.

There were fewer birds about. Tinkling of the wind chimes in the yachts’ rigging replaced the honking of geese and the squabbling of seagulls.

Helicopter

Like a lofted shuttlecock, a helicopter whirred overhead.

Leaving Jackie in the car, I walked along the pebbled shore, past the paddling birds near the castle, and round the bend as the sea wall makes way for a coastal footpath.

Dog whiteSpotting a potential passage through the undergrowth to the promenade, I pushed through it. On the upper level I was warned off by a big beautiful beast. Scaling a slope with vociferous open jaws ahead of me and brambles encircling my legs, I was loath to miss a photo opportunity, although not in complete control of the framing. Clearly no stranger to the camera lens, my subject sheathed its fangs and adopted an angelic expression. My canine friend at last obeyed its master’s voice, and caught up with him and his more obedient companion, whilst I made my way back to the car in the opposite direction, there to

bid farewell to waders and gulls. The apparently preening cygnet is in fact a stray buoy.

It is fair to say that we had achieved our aim to see Keyhaven in a different light.

This evening we dined on lean beef burgers, new potatoes, and crunchy cauliflower, followed by blackberry, apple, and plum crumble with vanilla ice cream. I finished the Côte du Rhone.

Marylebone And St John’s Wood

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The car broke down as Jackie was leaving for a shop yesterday afternoon. We counted our blessings that this had not happened during our weekend trip to Nottingham. It did, however, mean that a domestic day was in order. Consequently I scanned another dozen colour slides from the Streets of London Series (May – June 2004). These were uploaded into WordPress without too much need for gnashing of teeth.

Manchester Street W1 5.04

Manchester Street W1, Lies between Baker Street and Marylebone High Street;

Hinde Street/Marylebone Lane W1 5.04

not far away is the Danish Express Laundry on the corner of Marylebone Lane at 16 Hinde Street, W1. This appears to be very popular.

Jason Court W1 5.04

Still in Marylebone, was this gentleman attending to the water supply?

Welbeck Street W1 5.04

There was the ubiquitous scaffolding in nearby Welbeck Street, W1;

Cavendish Place W1 5.04

and, in Portland Place, near Cavendish Place, W1, an example of the imaginative screening that is sometimes erected round more extensive building works.

John Prince's Street W1 5.04

Regular readers will realise that the music posters in Margaret Street are out of focus because I was fixed on featuring John Prince’s Street sign. Kevin Little is clearly visible, but I cannot read the legend of the young lady who also adorns the post. I think she is the UK R & B singer, Javine.

Margaret Street/Marylebone Passage W1 5.04

Wikipedia tells us:

“The London Fo Guang Shan Temple is located at 84 Margaret Street, London W1.[1] It was established in 1992 and is also known as International Buddhist Progress Society. It is one of two British branches of Fo Guang Shan Monastery, Taiwan.[2]

The temple is located in a former parish school and Church House of 1868-70 designed by William Butterfield. The building is grade II* listed.[3]”

On the wall of the earlier religious establishment can be seen the remnants of its contemporary street sign.

Bucknall Street WC2 6.04

Bucknall Street, WC2 lies just south of New Oxford Street. Scaffolding was also in place there. The wood block is probably in situ to prevent drivers mounting the kerb in this narrow little street.

Salisbury Street NW8 6.04

The Traders Inn at 52 Church Street on the corner of Salisbury Street, NW8, stands on a site from which gas masks were issued in 1939. Memories of that time are recorded in http://www.churchstreetmemories.org.uk/page/bert_black

Ashbridge Street NW8 6.04

Whoever parked his or her bike in Ashbridge Street, NW8, was taking a risk. Perhaps the reflected gentleman using the public phone box hadn’t yet caught up with the mobile revolution.

Gateforth Street NW8 6.04

The two figures in this photograph are indicative of the multi-cultural nature of our capital. Gateforth Street NW8 was named Capland Street until 1915. The Duke of York was rebuilt in its present form in 1932, and closed in 2007, three years after it entertained followers of Euro 2004. I believe it is now a restaurant.

Park Road NW1 6.04

St Cyprian’s Church commemorates the third century Christian martyr and Bishop of Carthage. The current building dates from 1903, and its history is told in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Cyprian’s,_Clarence_Gate

This evening we dined on Jackie’s perfect pork paprika, new potatoes, and crunchy carrots and cauliflower. Jackie drank Hoegaarden, and I drank more of the Côtes du Rhone. Observant readers will note that we have enjoyed this basically Hungarian dish three days in succession. That is because, fortunately, the Culinary Queen had made enough for six servings.