Many Sightings Of Roe Deer

After lunch today Jackie drove us all to Hockey’s Farm Shop where we left the young family to explore while we took a short drive in the near vicinity.

A veritable herd of donkeys in the road outside the shop were engaged in their favourite leisurely game of disruption of the traffic. One attempted to join me in the passenger seat when I returned to the car. The greens at Ibsley, although the waters had receded somewhat, continued to offer

waterlogged reflections of trees above,

and a paddling pool for ponies,

one of whom was in sight of cousins casting shadows on the other side of the road.

Two gentlemen sat atop Rockford Sandpit;

their voices reached me at the bottom, whence I photographed the scene

and its surrounding woodland.

From Ellingham Drove, where we spotted one of our many sightings of roe deer in the shade, we drove to the main road where we filled up with petrol and returned to Hockey’s to collect the others.

Later, following the advice of SueW, I recovered the pictures from the following posts:

This evening we all dined on more of Jackie’s tasty pasta Bolognese, with which she drank Hoegaarden and I drank Valle Central Reserva Privada Syrah, 2021.

More Work On Posts

After lunch, before I settled down to watch the ITV transmission of the France v Italy Six Nations rugby match, Jackie cut my hair.

When the game had finished I stepped outside to chase a dying sunset down the back drive

and into the Royal Oak car park.

In between times, following SueW’s guidance, I recovered the pictures for the following posts:

also included the header picture for

and reactivated its link to the history.com site: https://www.history.com/news/mountbatten-assassination-ira-thatcher

This evening we all dined on Jackie’s pasta Bolognese with piquant cauliflower cheese on the side. She drank more of the Grüner Veltliner and I finished the Shiraz.

More Pictures Recovered

This morning Shelly visited to bring us two more plug-in heaters sent by Helen.

I spent the afternoon watching TV broadcasts of the Six Nations rugby tournament matches between Wales and Ireland and between England and Scotland.

Later, with the advice and guidance of SueW I recovered pictures that had been lost from the following posts:

This evening we dined on more of yesterday’s wholesome, stewp.

September 22 Picture Recoveries

I spent much of the day recovering, as advised by SueW, the pictures to the following posts:

Later I published

https://derrickjknight.com/2023/02/03/droll-tales-6/

This evening we all dined on Jackie’s chicken stewp, supplemented by turkey, duck, and ham, with which she drank more of the Grüner Veltliner and Drank more of the Shiraz.

A Victorian Rebuild

Early this morning, a representative of Norman’s Heating visited to assess for quotation our requirements for a new oil tank. The good news is that we don’t need such a big container. We await the estimate.

After lunch Jackie drove us all to Ringwood, where we left Flo, Dillon, and Ellie while she and I took a trip out of the forest where we stopped beside

a bridge over the River Avon on the road to Harbridge.

Every year the Avon around the area overflows its banks. This is just

one spot where water meadows are created.

An egret was happily foraging there.

The little community of Harbridge has such a long history that I have included the following paragraphs for those who are interested. You may wish to skip these and scroll down to the churchyard pictures.

‘Herdebrige (xi cent.); Hardebrygg (xiii cent.); Haberigge (xiv cent.); Harebrigg (xv cent.); Hardbridge (xvi cent.).

The parish of Harbridge contains over 4,000 acres, comprising 650 acres of arable land, 986½ acres of permanent grass and 356½ acres of woodland. (fn. 1) The height above sea level is for the most part above 100 ft. and below 200 ft. The soil is sandy, the subsoil gravel, which has been considerably worked. (fn. 2) The western and south-western parts of the parish comprise the great uncultivated tracts of Plumley Heath with its tumuli and Nea Heath. In the south-east is Somerley, the seat of Lord Normanton, with its magnificent picture gallery and its park of 900 acres. Nearly the whole parish together with Ibsley and Ellingham belongs to Lord Normanton’s estate.’

‘The little village of Harbridge, with its church, lies about 2 miles north-east of Somerley, at the edge of the low meadow land to the east of the River Avon. North again are Harbridge Green and North End Park and Farm. Old Somerley is on the northern border of Somerley Park.’

‘In 1086 HARBRIDGE was held of the king by Bernard the Chamberlain, having been held by Ulveva in the days of the Confessor. The assessment had fallen from 5 hides to 3 hides and 1 virgate. (fn. 4) The subsequent history of Harbridge is not easy to unravel. Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, the last of the Clares, was receiving a rent of 25s. 8d. held of the king by knight service at his death in 1314. (fn. 5) This was then committed to the charge of Lawrence de Rustiton, and afterwards of Richard de Rodeneye, Ithel de Keyrewent and Richard de Byflet, keepers of the earl’s lands, (fn. 6) the places of the last two being subsequently taken by Bennet de Cokefeld and William de Aylmere. (fn. 7) It was probably by virtue of the Clare possessions that the king’s name occurs in the Nomina Villarum of 1316. (fn. 8)

‘The king’s parcenary in 1316 was Isabel de Acton. (fn. 9) Her holding may be traced in the messuage and virgate the reversion of which Sir John Poyntz conveyed to Sir John de la Hale and his heirs in 1364. (fn. 10) John Palmer was then holding the estate of the hereditament of Poyntz; after his death it was to remain to Joan wife of Sir John de Acton, deceased, and after her death to remain to Poyntz or by the terms of the conveyance to Sir John de la Hale.’

‘By the early part of the 15th century Harbridge, then known as a manor, had come into the hands of a Henry Smith who was unjustly disseised by John Poole. (fn. 11) However, in January 1500 Thomas Poole of Holwall (co. Somers.), a descendant of John, sold and quitclaimed to John Smith of Askerswell (co. Dors.) grandson of Henry, both for himself and Margery, late wife of Thomas Trowe, and possibly sister or mother of Thomas Poole, (fn. 12) all right and title in the manor of Harbridge, together with all the possessions of the late Margery Trowe, and those occupied by Jane widow of John Poole, uncle of Thomas, and by Edith Poole widow. (fn. 13) The full sum due on this sale was not paid off, however, until 1504, (fn. 14) and meanwhile Poole conveyed the premises to Sir John Turbervyle and to Richard Kemer. (fn. 15) Nevertheless Nicholas Smith, heir, presumably, of John, died seised in 1538, (fn. 16) leaving a widow Sybil, on whom Harbridge was settled in dower for life, and a son and heir George. Sybil apparently married as her second husband John Okeden, (fn. 17) with whom she was holding the manor for the term of her life in 1541, (fn. 18) in which year Jaspar Smith, presumably brother of Nicholas, settled all his reversionary right on Thomas Whyte. Sybil died in 1551, leaving as heir her son George Smith before mentioned, then sixteen years old. (fn. 19)However, by 1567 Harbridge was carried by coheiresses Elizabeth and Jane to their respective husbands John Rose and Francis Poyntz. (fn. 20) The remainder was to Ambrose Rose of Ringwood, who sold it in 1601  (fn. 21) to John Wykes of Harbridge. Francis Poyntz quitclaimed to the new lord a few years later. (fn. 22) The Wykeses continued to hold during the greater part of the 17th century. John Wykes had been sequestered in 1649 and in 1654 he was still awaiting redress. (fn. 23) In 1688 Lewis Bampfield and Elizabeth his wife and Margaret Wykes, spinster, were party to a conveyance of the manor, when, however, one John Wheeler seems to have been in actual possession. (fn. 24)Elizabeth and Margaret would seem to have been the co-heirs of the Wykeses and Margaret was probably the Margaret wife of William Bowreman who with her husband and Lewis and Elizabeth Bampfield sold three messuages and land in Harbridge, Ellingham, Hurst, Blashford, Rockford, Ringwood, Lyndhurst, Linwood and the New Forest to Henry Hommige in 1689, warranting him against the heirs of Elizabeth and Margaret. (fn. 25) By 1693 the manor was in the hands of Edward Twyne (fn. 26) and in 1700 Joseph Hussey and Mary his wife sold it to Joseph Gifford. (fn. 27)Early in the 18th century Gifford must have sold the manor to James Whitaker, (fn. 28) who in 1733 conveyed it to Dayrell Hawley. (fn. 29) No further mention of Harbridge Manor has been discovered until 1810, when it was held by Percival Lewis. (fn. 30) Soon after that it passed to the Earl of Normanton (see Somerley) and now forms part of the Somerley estate.’

‘The Punchardons had an estate in Harbridge for a considerable period. In 1263 Robert de Punchardon and Alice his wife quitclaimed from themselves and the heirs of Alice a messuage and a carucate of land to William de Punchardon, Maud his wife and Hawis her sister and the heirs of Maud and Hawis. This seems to have been the same estate of which in 1375 John de Boyland of Eling and Alice his wife, holding it of the hereditament of Alice, conveyed a moiety to William de Athelyngton and a moiety to Oliver de Punchardon, the whole estate being in the actual possession of John Bereford and Denis his wife for the life of Denis. (fn. 31) Oliver de Punchardon died seised of lands there in 1417. (fn. 32) Like Ellingham (q.v.) the Punchardon moiety of Harbridge passed to the Okedens, (fn. 33) and in 1604 William Okeden sold it to Thomas Worsley, (fn. 34) who died seised in 1620, (fn. 35) leaving an infant grandson Thomas Worsley as his heir. Thomas Worsley’s daughter Barbara was the wife of a William Bowreman, whose namesake, possibly himself or a son, was dealing with land in Harbridge in 1689. (fn. 36) From that date this moiety of Harbridge undoubtedly merged in the manor proper and belongs at the present day to the Earl of Normanton.’

‘The church of ALL SAINTS is an ashlar-faced building consisting of chancel, nave and west tower, rebuilt in 1838 in 15th-century style, but part of the tower masonry appears to be older. There is a small wall tablet to Edward Dodington ob. 1656, with a quartered shield.

The bells are three in number, all by Thomas Mears, 1839.’

Extracts from https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/hants/vol4/pp604-606#p1

The lichen covered gravestones are largely indecipherable, although there are good number of the Pratt family. Many seem to bear very early Victorian dates, and look even earlier. There is a phalanx of four shaped yews guarding the entrance path, and one of greater age round the back. Snowdrops are in abundance.

This evening we all dined on Mr Pink’s fish, chips, and mushy peas, Garner’s pickled onions, and Tesco’s sliced gherkins. Jackie and I both drank Grüner Veltliner 2020.

Tail End Charlie

When my struggles to pay a couple of bills on line, although ultimately successful, this afternoon had reduced me to a state of apoplexy, Jackie suggested a forest drive. This seemed a good idea.

We had driven up to and beyond Penn Common without finding anything of photographic interest until we found fauna galore down

Newbridge Road, where Jackie parked the Modus and I wandered

among the cattle in the woodland where winter- shaggy curious cows and calves roamed, scratched, canoodled and occasionally disrupted traffic.

Further down the hill was the domain of ponies, also sporting their extra thick coats brought on by our recent cold spell.

A few of these had crossed the road to converse with field horses at their gate.

As we approached Bramshaw a string of Saddleback piglets escaping from a pen somewhere streamed across the road in front of us. Jackie wound down her window for me to catch them rushing by on the muddy verge. I almost missed Tail End Charlie who had put on a spurt in an attempt not to be left behind. He had even missed out on the complete colouring carried by his porcine cousins.

Later this afternoon, with the usual help from SueW, I recovered pictures to the following posts:

This evening we all dined on tasty roast gammon, piquant cauliflower cheese, creamy mashed potato, crunchy carrots, tender runner beans, cabbage, and leeks , with which Jackie drank Hoegaarden and I drank Coonawarra Shiraz 2021.

Not Suitable For Your Age Group

When Jackie attempted to log in to our BBC iPlayer channel last night she was blocked by today’s title message. Initially perplexed she eventually twigged the problem. Bear with me and all will be revealed.

Of late Ellie has become rather keen on

Teletubbies, as shown on BBC TV.

In fact she enjoyed it with her mother this morning. She becomes very animated when watching, occasionally blows bubbles, waves her arms and legs about, and tries to say hello when the babies do.

When we tune in to iPlayer we have icons on which to click to select who is watching. We usually select D for Derrick. It now appears that her grandmother has added an E for Elowen. This had been left selected and she – as it seemed – wasn’t allowed to watch her great grandmother’s choice.

While awaiting a delivery of a few more paving slabs Martin was unable to continue with fitting them. He therefore spent the morning tidying the rose garden

in the company of Nugget Junior, who flitted to and fro from perch to perch.

Now we have stopped lighting the open fire the jackdaws have returned to the chimney pots.

This afternoon Stuart from Tom Sutton Heating fitted the immersion heater part and left all in working order.

I celebrated by recovering the photographs to the following posts:

As with all of these Sue W is sending me back the pictures from her links so that I can replace them into my new site.

This evening we all dined on succulent roast duck, crisp roast potatoes, sage and onion stuffing, firm Brussels sprouts and crunchy carrots with tasty gravy, followed by bread and butter pudding, with which Jackie drank Hoegaarden and I drank more of the Gran Selone.

Three Ponies For A Pound

After lunch today, with, as usual, SueW’s help, I recovered the pictures to the following posts:

This afternoon Jackie and I took a forest drive.

When I photographed these grasses in and the log teepee beside a section of Hatchet Pond that I had often photographed before I had not realised that I was about to learn that this was known as Little Hatchet.

Approaching a larger area of the lake I noticed sky borne evidence that a woman was tossing food for gulls

and a pair of swans who she told me were Norman and Nancy, who normally had their home in Little Hatchet, where Flo and I had photographed them with their cygnets on 27th May.

Each year they chased the other Cygnus family away from this section, where I had photographed them before Christmas, and took possession of the spot in case they would like to move home.

We drove on to Furzey Lane where Jackie noticed, and photographed, that the thatcher’s donkey on a rooftop had provided even more material for nesting birds.

She also focused on the landscape into which the avians had probably carried their stolen straw.

Nearby stands the Furzey Lodge Pound, which we have never before seen occupied.

Today there were three residents.

This evening we all dined on perfect pork chops with mustard sauce and almond topping; sautéed new potatoes and leeks; roast sweet potatoes and mushrooms; crunchy carrots, and tender green beans, with tasty gravy. I drank more of Gran Selone and no-one else did.

He Wanted To Buy Some Sausages

We had intended to take a forest drive after shopping at Tesco this morning.

Because I had forgotten to bring a book while waiting in the car, I decided to photograph shoppers at their work,

including this gentleman whose task it was to collect up the trolleys and return a stack to the collection point.

As it turned out this was just as well, because our car responded to Jackie’s attempt to start up with a graunching hiccup.

This meant that forest time was occupied by waiting for the RAC to visit, confirm our own diagnosis of a battery problem, sell and fit a new one. Michael, the very pleasant mechanic, arrived in an hour and took less than half an hour to complete his work.

In the meantime, her smile wiped away, Jackie had returned to the shop to buy lunch.

When Michael told us that the dying battery was seven years old and one of theirs, this reminded Jackie that that one had been fitted when a similar breakdown occurred in Ferndene Farm Shop and the man who had responded to her call on that occasion said he had fought off all competition for the job because he wanted to buy some sausages.

Soon after we returned home Ian brought back Flo, Dillon, and Ellie.

This afternoon I recovered lost files in

This evening we all dined on more of yesterday’s beef in red wine which Ron had insisted we brought home; creamy mashed potatoes, firm cauliflower, carrots, broccoli and Brussels sprouts, with which Jackie drank more of the Chardonnay and I drank Gran Selone Premium Collection Italian red.

The Coven And Warlocks

This morning, with the aid of SueW, I recovered the photographs for:

This afternoon Jackie drove me to Shelly and Ron’s for a lengthy family lunch. The three former Rivett sisters periodically convene for lunch or coffee and cake. This is affectionately termed a coven meeting. Today their three warlocks, Ron, Bill, and I, were included.

Our nephew Neil dropped in to see his parents and stayed to converse happily with the rest of us, before the three ladies returned from visiting their mother’s ashes plot with the customary Christmas wreath, delayed through illness.

Jackie contributed a large saucepan of beef in red wine; Shelly provided the vegetable dishes of tender green beans, broccoli, carrots, and Lyonnaise potatoes; Helen provided flavoursome cherry pie and pear and ginger flan, with custard or cream according to taste.

Hostess Shelly served Jackie’s beef in red wine;

we helped ourselves to the vegetables;

then tucked into our plentiful platefuls.

Helen then served desserts, after which we repaired to the sitting room for coffee, Cointreau, crossword, quiz, and congenial conversation.