“That’s Quite A Bunch”

This is my post for yesterday, 22nd May. I seem to have forgotten to send it until now.

Just as I was beginning to regret not having ordered breakfast, Nurse Lucy asked me if I would like some coffee. I would. She brought me a large mug. I drank it all. Soon afterwards the breakfast lady came with more coffee, and asked me if I was sure I didn’t want breakfast. I wasn’t. She brought me twice the usual ration of toast. I scoffed it.

I also had a little accident. I began pouring the coffee into the full jug of milk, with the consequences that would be expected. Now, Mrs Knight, do not mark this down as me getting back to normal.

Soon after 9 a.m. it was Nurse Jing’s turn to put me through agony. This was in order get me out of bed through the customary machinations, when she was sure I was comfortable perched on a stool in front of the wash basin she left me to my ablutions, with instructions to use the alarm cord if necessary. That was probably the moment I blew it. Up until now, I had still been unable to open my bowels. I had a go at sitting on the loo. This, you realise involved the usual painful motions. Not those I was hoping for. My bowels remained firmly closed.

By this time, I was a clammy mess and summoned help. Whilst Alisha was doing her best to get me decent, Mr Kask, paid a visit, brusquely prescribed suppositories and an attempt at the stairs. I don’t think he was offering an easy way out. When Alisha offered me a choice of chair or bed, I opted for the bed, into which I collapsed.

Less than half an our later, Alex came to get me out of bed and transferred to another ward. Starting with the frame, we decanted to the crutches in the corridor.  I managed half the rest, in a wheelchair.

Soon afterwards, I was given liquid morphine. I was encouraged  to stay in the chair. That didn’t last long.

Eventually, with assistance, I returned to bed. Alex returned with Connor, and said immediately that we would not be doing the stairs today. I told him that that had given me great relief.

Later, I enjoyed conversation with Ted, a very friendly man who now shares my four bay ward.

After lunch, Jackie drew the attention of the medics to the excessive swelling on my affected knee. This had become most worrying to her., Dr Veselina was worried enough to consult with Mr Kask on the telephone and bring another consultant see it. A blood test was ordered. Dr Veselina G. administered this this evening I asked her what it was for. It was for haemoglobin levels and various other ingredients. I said that was “quite a bunch”, and was called upon to translate the phrase. Ted chipped in quite helpfully. The relationship between me and the Bulgarian doctor is good enough for such an exchange. Later, it was Marcus’s turn to take the routine evening blood test. I ate no dinner. Having secured my comfort, Jackie returned home.

 

53 thoughts on ““That’s Quite A Bunch”

  1. It’s a tortuous journey to recovery but I hope I am correct in feeling that you do have an army of good souls (led by the fair, and rather aptly named, Mrs Knight) on your side ⚔️

  2. A tough day. What a relief that you weren’t required to tackle the stairs. Now you need relief of a different kind 😉 I hope today is easier for you, Derrick 🙂

  3. I wish you could eat, Derrick. Try extra hard to eat at least all the healthy stuff – even if it is just the fruit and vegetables.

    (P.S. Sent on the assumption that almost everyone benefits from a little extra fussing, no matter what he or she might believe).

  4. I was quite concerned when there was no post from you yesterday, knowing how hospitals can cock up. Thank heavens Jackie is there keeping an eye on everything. She sure will be ready to whisk you off to the safety of the Old Post House just as soon as you walk the required steps and have the required poo!!

  5. It worried me to see you miss a day too.

    It’s Catch 22 – the morphine causes constipation but the consequences of not taking the morphine will not be good. Number One son had the same problem when they left him for four days before setting his broken leg.

    Hopefully you will start finding things easier as the days go on. Fingers crossed! 🙂

  6. I was also worried when I didn’t see a post from you yesterday, since I know you never miss. I’m sorry you had such a difficult day, but I hope today has been better. I’m glad Jackie and others are looking after you.

  7. Oh and aw. 😦 I’m sorry to hear it was such a rough day, Derrick. 😦
    Each day will get a bit better and soon you will be home.
    Continued healing wishes sent your way.
    I’m so glad you have such wonderful people taking care of you!
    (((HUGS)))

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