A Day In The Life Of

It is probably accurate to say that my day began at 2 a.m. That’s because I didn’t just doze off again, but actually did some work on my computer.

Then I dozed off.

Then the lovely Elise woke me to take my blood pressure and stuff, with “How are you today?”.

“I’m much better except when people wake me up to do stuff to me”.

Laughter.

It must then have been about 6.30 a.m. when I heard: “Would you like some tea or coffee?”

” No thanks” must have seemed very churlish. At least it was delivered with a smile.

“You haven’t ordered any breakfast” must have woken me at about 7 a.m.

With another smile, “because I didn’t think I would be able to eat any. But thank you for checking.

The wittily caring Carley has been my nurse for the day. “Here are your painkillers”. I’m not sure when. “I’ll have to sit you up a bit. Cos I don’t want you choking”.

“That would be most unfortunate”.

“Especially after all that work we did yesterday.”

Soon after 9 a.m. my liquid morphine was administered in preparation for the torture session administered by Marcus, today’s physiotherapist. He arrived about half an hour later. ready to get me out of bed.

“First you must roll over on your side”.

Given choice, I opted for left.

“Swing your good leg. I will hold the operated one”.

Gradually using the walking frame I transferred my weight from my bum on the edge of the bed to both feet and the handles of the walker.

“Starting with the good leg take steps toward the chair,”

“Not so big steps”.

“Now turn sideways”

“Using the same system?”

“Yes”.

“When you feel the chair on the backs of your legs, try to lower yourself onto the seat.”

Mission accomplished. I thought.

At this point there is an interruption in the proceedings, because Marcus returned this afternoon `with Connor, a student.

“This afternoon we are going to a few more steps down the corridor with the Zimmer fame, and if successful transferring to the crutches.”

My complex expression, attempting to display both horror and amusement, was a giveaway.

“I can see you are very pleased with this suggestion”.

I then explained what had been inflicted upon me since his departure this morning.

I had waited for Gerrard to come and collect me for an x-ray. During this time Alex had guided me from

“Why are you wearing the name tag Alex Chris, when you are not Marcus?”.

“Because I am not Marcus”.

“Ah”.

Then, using the same process, one small step at a time, Alex masquerading as Marcus, ย had guided me round the bed, into the corridor , and a few yards along it. We then turned around to reverse our steps.

I was then asked to feel for the front of Gerrard’s wheelchair behind me. Gerrard then took over.

“Place your good leg on the footrest. Leave the operated leg to me”.

We each played our part and were soon off to x-ray for the ‘after’ pictures.

Back in my room I was given the chance of ย returning to bed or remaining in the chair. Given that I was expecting a visit from Mr Kask, I opted for the chair, and promptly went to sleep. He was the next to disturb my slumber. It didn’t take him long to pronounce himself satisfied.

I asked Carley to help me back to bed after this.

Omelette lunch

Lunch soon arrived. I woke up to eat it. I hope those readers who have expressed concern about the quality of the catering at New Hall will be suitably impressed by this ‘small’ option. I am not sure what the soup was, but it was very tasty. The omelette was plain, of my own choice, and the ice-cream was excellent vanilla. Nevertheless I could only consume one spoonful of soup, Three quarters of the egg, a sprig of rocket, one potato, one slice each of tomato and cucumber, and most of the ice-cream. This morning’s Health Care Assistant had advised that the new slippers were a precaution against slipping, not really to keep germs away. Perhaps I’ll check this tomorrow.

By mid-afternoon I was again interrupted from my posting. Jackie, Elizabeth, and Danni stayed for a good long visit. We conversed about all our usual topics, especially focussing on my sister’s house sale and purchase. My head was clear enough today to make what I thought were reasonable contributions.

Afternoon tea consisted of moist, well-filled egg and cress sandwiches, orange juice, and fruit salad, which I couldn’t face.

I hadn’t ordered any dinner.

 

 

105 thoughts on “A Day In The Life Of

  1. I’m glad you seem to be approaching your recovery with humor.
    The food at your hospital looks much better than the food I’ve seen in American hospitals–and no afternoon tea! ๐Ÿ™‚

  2. These places seem determined that one shouldn’t get a good sleep! It seems you are kneely mobile again.
    I am aghast at you turning down fruit salad. I am passionately fond of it.

  3. Darn it. Geoff said what I wanted to say. Your post had a slight “waiting for Godot” quality to it. Thank goodness for vanilla ice cream. Why bother with anything else? As for more! You truly have the stiffest of British upper lips, Derrick. Carry on.

  4. How annoying to keep being woken up, when what you need is rest and to get your strength back. Hope your appetite returns soon x

  5. Yes, for some reason, hospital employees don’t let you get enough sleep. They are always popping in for one thing or another.

    So do your best
    To get some rest
    Eat when you can
    If just an egg in a pan
    Soon you will be home
    Free to sit or roam
    ๐Ÿ™‚

    Healing HUGS,
    Carolyn ๐Ÿ™‚

  6. I know you are not yourself given that so much food is being paraded by you and being refused! And I’ve never understood hospitals penchant for waking people up – it’s like they don’t know that sleep is healing……… Still, it sounds like its coming along well, you are moving and all the bits are moving with you and nothing has fallen off yet. Hurrah for morphine!! xoxo

  7. Seems you are doing good thus far. The key still remains to work that knee with your therapist as often as you can to keep it flexible . It is not the most fun part of your recovery because it i uncomfortable in the early stages of your recovery, but the more you do now with moving it, they quicker you will be back to normal doing the things you like to do. Jackie will be an integral part and your motivator to ensure you do your physical exercises at home on a regular basis. You want to get that knee to bend back as far as you can and not to let the scar tissue interfere with those movements. Again, my 2 cents worth form my days of going thru this 2 times!

  8. I’ve always said the VERY worst place to get any sleep at all is a hospital except perhaps early afteroon. But most assuredly NEVER at night. If they are coming into your room periodically then it’s all the noise out in the hall. I think they save all the really, really noisy things to be done during the nighttime hours. You will feel better day by day and the PT will get easier and easier. I was in the hospital four 4 days and by the third day they had a little bunch of stairs I could climb. I pray you get to go home soon. Good to hear from you my friend. Love and hugs, N ๐Ÿ™‚ โค xo

  9. Your descriptive powers are amazing! You manage to transfer most of your feelings with the ease of a bird gliding over a soothing zephyr. Thanks for the wonderful report.

  10. Derrick sir, I was missing you. I thought you’ve forgotten me and my writing. You comments provide me motivation. I PRAY TO GOD FOR YOUR FAST RECOVERY and we want to see all your wonderful photography; as usual.

    My pray for your fast recovery
    Sure enough,
    You’ll be amongst the pine-trees
    And foliage
    And reveal their beauties
    By fixing the angle of your lens
    We miss you really

    With regards,
    HARBANS

  11. Keep up the good work Derrick. Sounds as if things are progressing well. Good to see you are probably losing a bit of weight too! Your knees will be happy about that as well
    , I imagine. Hope to see you soon. Lots of love, H & B XXXX

  12. Even in this situation, you manage to give your readers a clear view of what’s going on and a chuckle or two! Keep up the great work, in therapy and the blog!! All my best, Derrick.
    Oh, almost forgot. Yesterday, I almost said, “Hello, Jackie” to a woman at the gym. I had to tell you, the Head gardener has a doppelganger in South Florida!!

  13. All of the interruptions in a place of supposed rest and recuperation is insane. All I can think of is: This too shall pass.
    Best wishes for a speedy recovery and swift trip home to your lovely garden and Jackieโ€™s delicious cooking:)

  14. Gosh, Derrick, I’m tired after reading about all that. Hospitals are exhausting places! Your indomitable humour is clearly leading the way. Everything else will follow ๐Ÿ™‚

  15. I was surprised at how good the food looked. They really have you up and about quickly, but it seems a lack of sleep is the prescription of the day. Keep on, keeping on Derrick you will be home before you know it and then you will be able to get your much needed rest.

  16. I, too, was tired after reading your post and surprised by how good the food looked. But what a procedure. Routine for the health care team, not so routine for the patient. Across the pond, I am rooting for your speedy recovery.

  17. Petits pas ร  petits pas you are making progress which is heartening. I’m relieved that slippers are to prevent slipping – who knew?

  18. perhaps the morphine is more important than the wine…..I just had a colonoscopy yesterday, now what a treat that was….after they said no wine last night but the nurse winked and said it won’t kill me if I do….so I took that as a good sign. Rest up and glad everything went well for you my friend โค

  19. So I come back to FB and Scrabble after a very, very long break and what do I come back to but a pair of feet dangling out of the bottom of a hospital bed …. What on earth is going on Derrick ? Hope all is well xx

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