Repelling All Borders

The sparrows are back in their regular nest made from

an ineffective burglar alarm.

Mother takes her turn, but it is mainly father who stands guard from various vantage points and, looking this way and that, vociferously repels all boarders.

We lunched with Elizabeth and Mum at Woodpeckers. Mum enjoyed an omelette followed by apricots and ice cream. My sister and I chose an excellent steak and ale pie with creamed potatoes and vegetables; Jackie favoured mackerel and orange salad which she pronounced very good. We three guests all chose light and tasty date pudding and ice cream.

Afterwards leaving Brockenhurst by an unnamed narrow lane, Jackie and I continued further into the forest.

Three cyclists rested on a rail outside the village.

Until I approached too close we watched a group of deer among the trees at Boldrewood. Some of these creatures had lost their horns. I understand they will grow again.

On the road to Linwood I photographed ponies in the landscape,

and again on the hillside at Appleslade.

We simply dined this evening on beef and mustard sandwiches.

46 thoughts on “Repelling All Borders

  1. Papa Sparrow looks quite alert, and the deer portraits are wonderful, Derrick. I really like the photos of them amidst the trees.
    Your mother is fortunate to be living in a place that has such good food.

  2. Poor sparrows are nearly extinct, courtesy Mao. The male partner is a worthy guardian. The cyclists make for a great storytelling shot. I wonder what they are chatting about! As for the horns, deer akin to goats might regrow they horn for all I know.

    • Many thanks, Uma. We stopped for me to photograph three ponies – but I chose the cyclists instead. I just missed a shot of the man and the woman on his left clinking drink containers

  3. Your sparrow photos are superb! It is joy to watch birds and learn from them! πŸ™‚ The ones I’ve observed have been wonderful parents to their young.
    Oh, it sounds like such a delicious lunch and good time spent with your Mum! πŸ™‚ I’m so glad! I continue to pray for her health and happiness! πŸ™‚
    I’m glad the deer and ponies are finding some greens to eat, too πŸ™‚
    HUGS!!! πŸ™‚

  4. At my daughter’s previous home the deer paid early morning visits to her woodland garden, and since moving back here the family misses that. Never ever seen deer in our garden but the other day a neighbour told me a couple had visited his, he too has never seen them up here before.

  5. Wonderful shots of the local fauna, Derrick.

    It does amaze me that in such a comparatively small island nation with so many people on it, who all need land for agriculture, that your photos manage to show so much untouched natural countryside with barely a trace of human interference in it. πŸ™‚

    Long may it remain so! πŸ™‚

      • I could well imagine! 😦

        I should have realised that it was not just good fortune that this area was left ‘undeveloped’. It’s nice to know it’s natural value has been officially recognised and mostly maintained/protected. πŸ™‚

  6. Good morning with a poem Derrick because in the town i am living i can not see sparrows!!
    “Chittukuruvi muttham kodhuthu” (meaning: The sparrow kissed me) brings back fond memories of our younger days.

    Where Have The Birds Gone? By Hema Ravi

    Seed eating passerine bird,
    Small, pink legged, conical bill
    Grey brown, black throated males,
    Grey brown with eye bordered females,
    Black and tawny streaks on back,
    Black winged feathers with white patches
    Grayish white breasted birds.

    Busying themselves in spring with
    Straw, paper, twigs and grass
    Nesting on low branches, in our homes, in sheds.
    Children watched with interest nests in their homes,
    Small birds perched on ledges or lofts.
    Today, these have become a rarity,
    Where have these sparrows gone?

  7. I trust that it was proper hot English mustard not that softie sweet stuff that passes as mustard with our Yankee cousins.
    Nothing better than a decent roast beef sandwich with mustard.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.