Godwits Galore

This morning we drove to Ferndene Farm Shop for three bags of all Purpose compost.

Jackie explored the rows of plants on sale as she also bought some trailing lobelias, and

found time to encourage one of the resident pigs, which was labouring somewhat, to step up to the trough for a drink.

On our way home we took a short diversion through the forest. Like the New Forest itself it has been some time since the title ‘new’ was applicable to the first of these lanes; the second avoids the problem of nomenclature by not having any.

Ponies dotted around the moors en route to Burley.

As in the lanes above the foliage of Holmsley Passage bore an almost luminescent glow.

Late this afternoon Giles picked me up at home and drove me to the bird hide at Milford on Sea where we spent a pleasant hour in a very crowded cabin watching the birds.

One black headed gull was fascinated by his reflection in the shallow water;

others shared Hurst Pond with shelducks and swans.

For serious birders the highlight was 31 black tailed godwits, their long legs beneath the surface.

We think this might be a snipe, but it had its back to us so we could not discern the length of its beak.

A pied wagtail trotted along much nearer the hide.

Giles stayed on for dinner which consisted of roast lamb; mashed potato and swede; Yorkshire pudding; crunchy carrots; firm cauliflower; and tender runner beans, with rich gravy. Jackie drank Hoegaarden and our friend and I chose Mora Vista Merlot Bonarda 2018.

57 thoughts on “Godwits Galore

  1. If you have a large flock of 31 godwits, they might well be the Icelandic race, still on their migration. I think the pied wagtail is a white wagtail which is the European race. You can tell because the black of the back of the head and the breast do not touch but have a grey bit in between. And is it just me, Derrick but the rock with the snipe looks so like a cow sitting down that I thought it was one! Nostrils, eye sockets, the back, beginning of a tail. I formally christen it “Cow Rock” if it doesn’t already have a name!

  2. What wonderful outings, Derrick! I always love your animal and bird photos!
    A galore of godwits! I love that! πŸ™‚ Was the galore of godwits giggling?! (Sorry. I’m being silly…like the Laughing Kookaburra! πŸ˜‰ πŸ˜€ )
    My brothers took me on a “snipe hunt” when I was a little girl. Long story.
    I love visiting farm shops and nurseries! Your photos of the farm shop are lovely!
    HUGS for you and Jackie!!! πŸ™‚
    PS…I prefer most veggies crunchy and firm, not mushy…so I love hearing about your carrots and cauliflower!

  3. An interesting, enjoyable and absorbing one. Thanks sharing. Derreck sir, yesterday I along with my wife came to England and are staying with my son in Eastleigh. Enjoying every bit of time with my grand son, son and daughter-in-law.

  4. Your photo and these words

    “One black headed gull was fascinated by his reflection in the shallow water;”—

    brought to my mind….. these words of a poem .. Shadows in the Water’ by Thomas Traherne Shadows in the Water’ by Thomas Traherne …

    Our second selves these shadows be!!!

    Have a nice day Derrick ! Kisses to Jackie!!

  5. That’s a lovely looking garden centre – i’m sure Jackie was in her element. πŸ™‚
    Their prices are comparable to ours here, current rate of exchange considered.

    I love the white pony’s close-up. I think Sir Billy Connolly would have described him as ‘Windswept and interestin’.

    I think you are being a tad mischievous ascribing such narcissistic tendencies to the hunting Black-headed gull, sir?

    Your wagtail images are my favourites. πŸ™‚

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