Visiting Restrictions

This morning I printed a set of photographs for Aaron of his grappling with the erection of the Agriframes Bower.

After this Elizabeth dropped in to return a hammer and drink a cup of tea. She stayed for lunch after which we engaged in a wide-ranging discussion much of which centred on the coronavirus. This pandemic now seems to be following a geometric progression throughout Europe with consequences that are beginning to effect us all.

Andy, Elizabeth’s beloved son-in-law, despite asthma and diabetes,  has trained steadily for this year’s London marathon which has now been postponed to October.

Louisa and her family are booked to visit her brother, Sam, and his family in Australia in a couple of weeks’ time. It must be touch and go whether they will be able to fly.

With 41 cases of the virus now in our county the inevitable procedures have yesterday been implemented in Mum’s care home. Only near relatives can visit: we have to ring the bell for admission; wash; and have our temperature taken when inside. It can only be a matter of time before visits will be banned altogether. On leaving us, my sister would go on to see Mum and report back on the smoothness of the procedure.

Apparently those of us over 70 will be ordered to self isolate within a matter of weeks. The courage of the villagers of Eyam should never be forgotten.

After rain during the rest of the afternoon spent reading I wandered, camera round neck, while the weak evening light still held.

It only takes a twitch from me for the birds to scatter from the feeders suspended from the prunus Autumnalis in the front garden which contains a range of plants including

euphorbias, also found elsewhere, such as

on the back drive borders.

Ipheions persistently push through the patio paving;

Numerous hellebores,

and daffodils add their splashes of colour. The peach-centred beauties above are from a trough Jackie planted up for Mum when she was still in her own home.

Primroses appear throughout the garden, but there are still some waiting for a permanent place.

We now have some idea of the tints of the tulips sharing their pots with purple pansies.

Grape hyacinth spears stand proud. These are fronted by New Zealand flax.

The more cultivated hyacinths transplanted from gift pots continue to thrive.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s beefy cottage pie; crunchy carrots; and tender cabbage and runner beans with which she drank Hoegaarden and I drank Casillero del Diablo Reserva Merlot 2018.

 

 

Published by derrickjknight

I am a septuagenarian enjoying rambling physically and photographing what I see, and rambling in my head as memories are triggered. I also ramble through a lifetime's photographs

99 thoughts on “Visiting Restrictions

  1. At least there is the beauty of flowers to console us. I was so moved to read the story of the village during the time of plague. Oh, my! Best to you, Jackie, your mother, and the rest of your beautiful family during this time of the Coronavirus.

  2. Ah, you all seem to be on a similar trajectory with the virus as we are. We are staying home as much as possible, but have not yet been told to. We go to work and the grocery store but that’s about it. Things are closing and cancelling all around us. I hope your mom understands. It must be hard to think you might not be able to see her any time you want.

    And to have plans to challenge yourself in a marathon or travel to see loved ones and then have that taken away from you is a new phenomenon for most of us. I suspect my 10 mile race in May will also be cancelled. My April race has already been cancelled.

    Your garden has lightened my mood, as did my own garden today. I am thankful that this virus hit us in mid March instead of mid January. At least I can get outside and enjoy the garden on the nicer days. Hugs to you all – virtual hugs, not real ones – social distancing and all.

  3. My husband and I are both in the risk group. He just had open-heart surgery and I have an autoimmune disorder. We wills at home as much as possible, not liking it, but I think we all need to work together to not spread the virus.

  4. At least you have a beautiful garden and countryside you can wander about in–and a well-stocked library. Yes, that plague village. Courageous people indeed.
    Good luck to your mother. We are not allowed to visit my mother at all.

  5. At least you will have the beauty of the gardens when you self-isolate. I hope this modern day viral plague passes quickly. I am keeping you, Jackie and your families in my thoughts and prayers, especially your mother.

  6. The garden’s starting to bloom everywhere, it’s lovely. We’ve just « enjoyed » our first day in lock down. At least we can still get out on our bikes but only in groups of 10 or less.

  7. I think you missed a few naughts off, Derrick. The virus has reached 1,372 confirmed cases with an estimated five to ten thousand cases of infected people but not all officially diagnosed. The death toll has reached 35.

    Well done to your mother’s nursing home for taking those strict precautions.
    I can understand the advice to over 70s. We are in the most vulnerable age group and the most likely to have underlying health problems. Unfortunately, there isn’t a country in the world that has enough intensive care beds and ventilators to treat patients on such a mass scale.

    On a lighter note, your photographs as usual are quite lovely.

      1. I apologise and I need to learn not to skim when reading familiar words! How often I have said this to young readers!
        I meant to say those affected in your area had just gone up Not Deaths! I had just been studying areas affected. I must stop commenting late at night – I was stone cold sober too not a drop had passed my lips, I’m having a alcohol free week, not fun at all! 🙂

  8. Yes, unfortunately this situation it start to affect our daily life…Please stay safe!
    The good thing for you is that even if you stay at home, you can enjoy these beautiful flowers! A magic garden!

  9. I certainly hope that self-isolating for the over-seventy crowd is optional here, since I go out to work on the docks every day. I may be over 70, but I don’t think there’s anyone more isolated than me during the work day — except for my boon companions, the gulls and pelicans, of course! I’ve grown quite weary of the easy definition here of anyone over sixty as “elderly.” I certainly intend to take precautions — I’m staying away from groups of people, hand-washing, and such — but I need and want to keep working. Office and retail workers are in a different situation, of course, and those who have health problems. Each case is different.

    1. And now I’ve read your linked post about the village in the time of the plague. I read recently that across the US, libraries have been receiving far more than the usual number of requests for Camus’s book, and I’ve heard several people mention that they’re reading it. It’s quite something that a book like that can be revived by circumstances probably never imagined by the author.

  10. I’m always amazed by how many beautiful flowers you have in your garden. Your photo of the euphorbia set off with raindrops (dew drops?) is wonderful. And I love all the hellebores. You have a great variety of daffodils.

    Your discussion about the corona virus is similar to what is being experienced all around the world. Best wishes to your mum.

  11. Take care. This pandemic has altered life plans of so many people around the world. Hopefully the precautions various countries have taken will slow the spread and even choke the virus. We must remain positive.

  12. I so appreciate your photos, and as others have stated, your garden may provide purpose and joy during this time of isolation. We too are in self imposed isolation. I for one am in the population sector of those with “underlying health issues” so I am very very nervous about becoming infected with this virus.It’s going to get worse before it gets better. Be careful and safe.

  13. Life has certainly turned crazy with this coronavirus. We must just do all we can to keep others safe and keep safe ourselves. Your flower photos are beautiful – just what I needed this morning. Stay safe.

  14. Derrick and Jackie,
    It is early March 16 here in Illinois and I’m not tired. I was watching a movie and thought about you and Jackie, so I came over to see how you are faring. I think when Jackie’s garden is blooming, all is right in the world. I bet you enjoyed your fireplace last winter. Since I’ve visited you last, I closed my antique shop after 19 years, but the old bank building up for sale and am waiting to sell the building to begin the next adventure. I had a buyer last week but because his stock account was shockingly depleted (as was everyone’s), that may not go through now as it was going to be a cash sale. So that was fairly disappointing. All the little restaurants, taverns and shops were officially temporarily closed tonight in my village, so it is very cozy and quiet in my fortress with a hundred books, the internet and email. My mother, 91, was in the Sarasota Hospital in Florida at the same time the first coronavirus case was there last week. We were so incredibly lucky regarding the reason Mom was there, she was unsteady and fainting. It turned out that she was terribly low on B-12 and D3. Intravenous injections straightened her right out and the doctor said to get her out of there and back home. The nurse will come to the house to continue to administer the injections. She can now return to enjoying her long walks. I was sorry to read that you have lost some special people in your life.
    Glad you are both doing well. We are just moving into spring here. I was so eager to get outside and work in my little garden, that I cut the 15 feet long black raspberry bushes to waist height yesterday. It looks better with the building for sale. I had six big flower gardens that I took care of for 8 years for the village. The village board members never came downtown to look at them and I guess they didn’t think they were of much value (other people did) so they put blacktop over four of them and left two to go to weeds. I have to walk by them every day. Some people don’t value aesthetics. If I am here this summer, I can enjoy my perennials in my little garden. Two years ago, I got back the peony plant that my grandmother gave me in 1981. I had nowhere to put it then so I planted in at my mother’s summer place in Wisconsin. My grandmother brought the bush in Georgia on a trip in 1943! We also have our great aunt Hortense’s violet plants from 1952. Old friends.
    Please tell Jackie that I send my regards,
    Ginene
    foxandfinch@aol.com

  15. Derrick and Jackie,
    It is early March 16 here in Illinois and I’m not tired. I was watching a movie and thought about you and Jackie, so I came over to see how you are faring. I think when Jackie’s garden is blooming, all is right in the world. I bet you enjoyed your fireplace last winter. Since I’ve visited you last, I closed my antique shop after 19 years, but the old bank building up for sale and am waiting to sell the building to begin the next adventure. I had a buyer last week but because his stock account was shockingly depleted (as was everyone’s), that may not go through now as it was going to be a cash sale. So that was fairly disappointing. All the little restaurants, taverns and shops were officially temporarily closed tonight in my village, so it is very cozy and quiet in my fortress with a hundred books, the internet and email. My mother, 91, was in the Sarasota Hospital in Florida at the same time the first coronavirus case was there last week. We were so incredibly lucky regarding the reason Mom was there, she was unsteady and fainting. It turned out that she was terribly low on B-12 and D3. Intravenous injections straightened her right out and the doctor said to get her out of there and back home. The nurse will come to the house to continue to administer the injections. She can now return to enjoying her long walks. I was sorry to read that you have lost some special people in your life.
    Glad you are both doing well. We are just moving into spring here. I was so eager to get outside and work in my little garden, that I cut the 15 feet long black raspberry bushes to waist height yesterday. It looks better with the building for sale. I had six big flower gardens that I took care of for 8 years for the village. The village board members never came downtown to look at them and I guess they didn’t think they were of much value (other people did) so they put blacktop over four of them and left two to go to weeds. I have to walk by them every day. Some people don’t value aesthetics. If I am here this summer, I can enjoy my perennials in my little garden. Two years ago, I got back the peony plant that my grandmother gave me in 1981. I had nowhere to put it then so I planted in at my mother’s summer place in Wisconsin. My grandmother brought the bush in Georgia on a trip in 1943! We also have our great aunt Hortense’s violet plants from 1952. Old friends.
    Please tell Jackie that I send my regards,
    Ginene
    foxandfinch@aol.com

    WordPress.com / Gravatar.com credentials can be used.

    1. We were both very pleased to hear from you, Ginene, and return our love. Your Chinese pottery still stands in our kitchen. We hope your mother will be ok and wish you well in the next stage of your life. XX

  16. Thank you for sharing your beautiful flowers! They bring me joy!
    I’ve been thinking about your Mum alot, the past few weeks, and praying for her.
    Please be careful and safe. I know you and Jackie will take good care of each other.
    ❤ and (((HUGS)))

  17. Take care, Derrick. This is a nasty, spiteful disease that seems to target specific groups and the secret is going to be not catching it in the first place.

  18. Nursing homes here are now in total lock down, cruise ships have been cancelled, all sports, etc. You know what’s going on. I know I’m going to have a severe case of “cabin fever” by the time this is through.
    The flowers are terrific, but then again, I expect (because of past experience) that from your Head Gardener!!

  19. Jacinda has closed our borders so the whole country is in isolation – except there are already six confirmed cases and maybe more by now…… The Official Photographer (mine) may be put into isolation to work from home as they think shes the best bet to keep the University secure if the stuff hits the fan. Crazy times!!

  20. I doubt very much that tourists will be welcome anywhere in the world in a week, let alone a couple. If they’ve paid for their fares already, it might be prudent to inquire about cancellations/postponement now.

  21. Great flowers – at least something good is happening.

    They locked down Dad’s Care Home last week, but seem to have relaxed a bit – allowing close family and taking temperatures before they allow you in. I may give it a miss as I’m seeing people all the time in the shop and don’t want to be a carrier.

    Hope you are both keeping well.

  22. Those peach-centred daffodils are so lovely. My birds are also wont to fly away if I try to photograph them at the feeder. I keep trying though. I think this virus has stymied many peoples’ travel plans, ours included. Stay healthy, Derrick and Jackie.

  23. Oy! My employer has implemented the same rules as your mums nursing home “wash; and have our temperature taken when inside” it’s a whole new way to start the work day. I love the garden and its continuing bloom. I am a bit sadden if this doesn’t end I will have to purchase my herb starter plants at a big box store instead of from my local farmers market. Which is shut down.

  24. Very recently I read the plague story and wondered where I had read it in detail before. Now I remember, it was you who first brought my attention to it.
    I won’t comment on the coronavirus here as my blog post catch up reading is so behind, anything I have to say at at the 2nd April won’t be relevant to how it looked in mid-March. I’ll keep on reading posts for the time being.

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