Necking

This afternoon we drove to Lymington to collect a prescription for Elizabeth and delivered it to her at her home in Pilley.

Hairdressers have been unable to open since the beginning of the lockdown. It seemed to me that neither of the models decorating JW’s window in Rashley Mews was looking forward to the opening which will be possible from 4th. Observant readers, especially after bigification, may notice that the photographer could do with a visit.

We noticed two more knitted carer tributes on Pilley Street.

Contented ponies on the now virtually dry Quarry Pit lake bed grazed terrain over which they would normally be slaking their thirst.

Before leaving my sister’s village we encountered other happy croppers in Jordans Lane and Wooden House Road.

More ponies and a foal gathered by a stream on Beaulieu Road. Much tail twitching was in operation. Notice how the foal splays its legs to graze.

Foals, including a necking pair were also in evidence on the banks of Beaulieu River.

Cattle occupied the roads outside the village.

We wondered what breed exactly was this diminutive equine sampling the grass outside a field alongside South Baddersley Road?

This evening we dined on Jackie’s classic shepherd’s pie with tasty gravy accompanied by well cooked carrots, cauliflower, and cabbage with which she drank Hoegaarden and I drank more of the Cotes du Rhone.

Published by derrickjknight

I am a septuagenarian enjoying rambling physically and photographing what I see, and rambling in my head as memories are triggered. I also ramble through a lifetime's photographs

77 thoughts on “Necking

  1. Those two necking foals are so darned cute! I have never seen a horse—or any other animal—so split between black and white. Unique and would make a great image for racial tolerance.

  2. “Necking pair,” ๐Ÿ˜€. Wonderful photos, Derrick. I agree with Laurie about the coloring of that small horse. Definitely unique.

    Our hair salons opened up about two weeks ago, but I’m still waiting for a bit.

    1. I’m in South Jersey, too, Merril, and I just took the plunge yesterday and got my hair cut. It feels great, but I didn’t like the set up. They were all wearing these plastic face shields, which were totally open on the bottom near the neck area. Since I was sitting and she was standing above me (and TALKING THE WHOLE TIME), I felt like her germs were just raining out the bottom of the mask onto my head. I didn’t really think of this until it was almost over, but now I am not feeling great. I would have felt more safe if she had a fabric mask that had a closed bottom. So – if you decide to get a haircut, maybe peek in the window & see what they are wearing.

      1. Thanks, Jodie! I hadn’t even thought of that. I’ve seen photos of people wearing face shields AND masks. I guess that would be the ideal for them. I’ve seen the place I go to in Woodbury on FB and all the precautions they’re taking, but they say so much also depends on how long you’re there, ventilation, etc.

  3. I so admire the outpouring of emotion expressed in those carer tributes!
    The necking pair is lovely, but the black and white creature is truly a puzzling one, Derrick. Have you ever seen one like that?

  4. OH! Necking! YAY!!! And what a sweet pair those 2 are!!! ๐Ÿ™‚

    What you said about the models in the store front ads made me snort-laugh! ๐Ÿ˜€ Maybe some necking would make them happy. ??? ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜›

    Love that last photo! I bet when that equine is asked “What breed are you?” The response is, “I don’t know, but I take after both of my parents.”

    Your equine photos are so beautiful…they bring peace and joy! ๐Ÿ™‚
    (((HUGS))) ๐Ÿ™‚
    PS…your hair looks beautiful! I think we all have a more 1970’s vibe going on these days! ๐Ÿ˜‰

      1. Great post! Great ’70’s hair and facial hair! Jesus-looking, indeed! ๐Ÿ™‚

        I was in high school and college and then grad school in the 70’s. I loved the long hair and facial hair on men back then. ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. Oh, those necking ponies are precious! I love that photo! And the comment about the photographer and his need for a haircut had me stumped far longer than most “Where’s Nuggets.” But once I biggified I got the inference. Nice one!

  6. A lovely post. Thank you. Hadn’t read the word ‘foal’ in a while. It seems to me Americans use ‘colt’ more…
    Nice blog you have. Will be back.
    Cheers
    Brian

      1. LOL. I think I need to update my “about”. Originally I wanted to do a blog in 3 languages. I did start a bit, but I soon realized I had to stick to one. And preferably English. Fine by me. Have a nice week-end Derrick

  7. mmm… I did notice the hair a few posts back. Our hair dressers were allow to open a few weeks ago but not all did. The one I saw to on Sunday is quite big. There were 3 staff and no clients so I took the opportunity to have a hair cut.

    Perhaps the little guy is crossed with Gallaway cattle. ๐Ÿ˜‰

  8. I am very pleased to have photographic verification from the final picture in the post that the grass on the other side of the fence is actually greener. Thank you.

  9. Has a census ever been done, to see how many ponies there are in your woods? Is that a collar on the neck of one of the horses, the one with the splay legged foal.

    1. I’m sure there must be a census. There is a round up and medical check once a year. Many of the ponies wear reflective collars so drivers can see them in the dark. Thanks very much, Yvonne.

      1. That comment answered my question, Derrick. I was going to write a comment asking about what animal husbandry the free range equines receive, if any. Is the herd kept at a particular number of animals?

  10. I got a kick out of your commentary on the salon photos. Those two young women certainly have the model scowl down pat, don’t they? I also smiled at the cow walking down the middle of the road with her head down (places to go, people to see), and the two-toned equine proving that the grass really is greener on the other side of the fence.

  11. To the right of the frame, I could clearly see the photographerโ€™s Maine necking with the black and white model. I also think he needs to revisit much later than 4th of July.

    The pony among and against the stream of gleaming cars presents quite a composition.

      1. See how quickly I assumed her fame? Sorry, Pauline…I hereby bestow the linguistic crown back on thy head. I, in fact, stole it from Derrick.

  12. Hah! Perusing your photos on the e-mail before clicking into the web page, I was prepared to single out that pair of neckers and comment – and then I saw that you singled them out, too… as your cover photo! Good choice, Derrick. They captivated me! I love your horses’ swishing tails today. Were there flies bothering them? Or was it just warm, and that’s their air conditioning?

  13. It’s pretty amusing to see ponies and cattle simply rambling around the roadsides and lawns. I think English drivers must be so much more patient than those here. It’s really charming and dear. How do their caregivers gather them up at night? Or do they just live contently where ever it suits them? Or maybe they just all wander home at dinner time. Ha! I’m really curious about it all ๐Ÿ˜ Cheers xK

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