Mountain Sheep, Mountain Bikes, And Archery

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE. THOSE IN GROUPS ACCESS GALLERIES THAT CAN BE VIEWED FULL SIZE WHEN YOU SCROLL DOWN THE PAGE AND CLICK THE APPROPRIATE BOX.

On a dank and dismal day, Jackie cleaned out the Wisteria Arbour. This involved swabbing down the furniture, clearing dead plants and sweeping a multitude of leaves.

Jackie in Wisteria Arbour

As I came out to report on a FaceTime conversation with Malachi in Western Australia’s Fremantle I could smell the apple mint in the pot at the bottom right of the picture. The tulip is one brought back from Amsterdam by Danni and Andy a couple of years ago.

Malachi, occasionally punctuated by his sister Orlaith and his parents, read me an excellent story he had written and illustrated, and took me on a virtual tour of their new house.

Such an unspringlike day gave me the opportunity to remind ourselves of the season by following our friend, Barrie Haynes’s, prompt and featuring:

I spent the afternoon scanning the next batch of our 1992 Cumbrian holiday spent at Towcett with Ali, Steve, and James.

On 18th August we climbed the fells from Haweswater where we made the acquaintance of mountain sheep who looked rather more comfortable than I felt.

The youngsters, Louisa, naturally taking the lead, ascended with the help of mountain bikes and the rest of us hiked.

Louisa tackling daunting banana split 19.8.92 1As we know, Louisa is game for anything, but it looks as if she found this banana split, consumed at Tudor Restaurant, Penrith, rather daunting.

We stayed at Teal Cottage, one of the holiday homes in the grounds of Towcett House, the home of Jessica’s cousin Angie, and her then husband Viscount Hugh Lowther. There, Sam manufactured a bow and arrow and an archery contest soon got under way.

Louisa was first at the butts;

Sam followed;

and James brought up the rear.

I am grateful to Mary Tang for explaining how to remove the date stamp from these photographs.

Mr Pink’s fish and chips in Milford on Sea re-opened a few days ago, nine months after a fat fryer fire requiring thorough refurbishment. We were pleased to welcome them back and take cod and chips home to eat with gherkins and pickled onions. I drank more of the Bordeaux with mine.

61 thoughts on “Mountain Sheep, Mountain Bikes, And Archery

  1. Oh, I love that first picture of Jackie – she’s so cute – Her smile says, “Oh, it’s spring and I have a whole SEASON of work ahead in the gardens to look forward to – goody goody goody!”

  2. Well done with the date stamps; I wouldn’t have noticed if you hadn’t mentioned it. Well done Jackie for spring cleaning; she looks so pleased that we have to be pleased for her 🙂 Love the Cumbrian country and archery photos.

  3. What a captivating title. I was wondering if you were multi-tasking and doing all three at the same time. This was a delightful read, an insight into a pleasant day. Wishing you and Jackie many more. Harlon

    • Thanks very much, Shamim. I am honoured, but, unfortunately I have my work cut out to write a daily post, respond to comments, and read all those I follow. I can’t therefore manage the requirements of acceptance.

  4. The arbor is now looking fabulous and Jackie looks very pleased. I must say the Cumbrian countryside is beautiful and I, too, liked the archery shots. So happy for Mr. Pink’s, mostly because I like the name so much. I was sorry they were out of business for a while–no doubt fretting whether their customers would come back…

  5. I agree with Sue above about the photo of Jackie. She looks both delighted with the garden and eager to get to work. Springtime!
    Every time I think of Seven Brides for Summer Brothers, I remember discussing it with my daughters’ former Latin teacher, now friend, on a bus in Italy. Great dance scenes in that movie.

    That family vacation looks like was wonderful. I’m sure the photo bring back very fond memories.

  6. It never eases to amaze me, the lack of trees, in photographs I see of places like Cumbria. Why is this? Have you any idea? I’d have thought with the climate in England just about anything would grow.

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