The North/South Divide

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Today was another dull one with little sun after 10 a.m. This morning we took a motorised stroll through the forest

Breakfast

and brunched at Hyde-Out Café where I enjoyed a tastefully presented full English.

Cyclists on road 1

Just outside Bashley the first bunch of cyclists began disrupting the traffic.

Rubbish in stream

Someone had recently lobbed food packaging into the stream crossing Holmsley Passage, along which we passed the resident of

Modern House

the modern house that was once the site of the crossing keeper’s cottage.

Ponies on outfield 1Ponies on outfield 4

At Burley ponies had been engaged to mow the outfield of the cricket green.

Ponies on outfield 3

Some took a break,

Ponies on outfield 2

and, for one, the task had become all too exhausting.

Braggers Lane

It being the grockle season, only the narrower lanes like Braggers were free of cyclists and other cars designed to send drivers onto the verges.

Cyclists on road 2Cyclists on road 3Cyclists on road 4

More common were crocodiles like these escorted children wobbling along

Irises 3

opposite the irises blooming in Whitemoor Pond.

Foxgloves 1Foxgloves 2Foxgloves 3

Mauve foxgloves stood proudly erect all over the forest.

Orchids and ferns 1Orchids and ferns 2Orchids and ferns 3

On the slopes on other side of the road leading into Bolderwood, where the first two of these pictures were taken, wild orchids clustered among the curling ferns.

Orchids, ferns, and bottleBottle in ferns

Someone had lobbed a bottle into this lovely landscape.

Tree stump

Logging had been carried out in the vicinity of this stump with its moss-covered exposed roots.

Foal and ponies

The A31, that bisected the forest into North and South, spans the road through Bolderwood, bringing the modern world into stark contrast with the historic home of this equine family whose ancestors grazed the forest floors for centuries.

Horse riders

One of two riders crossing the heath on the other side of the main thoroughfare gave me a pleasant smile, after which we exchanged waves.

For our dinner this evening Jackie produced tasty chicken thighs marinaded in lemon and herbs and roasted with peppers; boiled potatoes, carrots, and green beans.

 

 

 

41 thoughts on “The North/South Divide

  1. It’s always a great visual treat to make an outing with you, Derrick❣️ And what a meal Jackie came up with, mouthwatering. 👍🏻👏🏻

  2. Breakfast looks good.

    I joined the Mayor of Blackburn’s Anti-Litter League when I was a kid (about 1962 I think). As a result of promising not to drop litter 55 yeas ago I have always been anti-litter.

    Get them young and they won’t grow up to drop litter.

  3. I like the ponies always, the ferns framing the wild orchids and enjoyed your lovely “full English.” The meal with lemon herbed chicken thighs with vegetables sounds even more scrumptious, Derrick.

  4. It is a fascinating account as usual. The link sent me to the detailed post on crossing keeper’s cottage, and the consuming obsession with profit at the cost of services. But then that is how the Milo Minderbinders of the corporate world would have it.

  5. That poor horse sprawled out across the green looks really winded! It made me smile 🙂 I also never knew there were feral ponies in England – then again, I saw some really stocky ponies when I was in a bus riding through Manchester four years ago, and they seemed too wild-looking to be domesticated stock.

  6. I always enjoy seeing the ponies, lying down or standing up! You live in a very beautiful place, Derrick and Jackie!

    Littering is a problem here too. We are always pulling someones bottles, papers and junk out of the front yard.

  7. I especially like “the historic home of this equine family whose ancestors grazed the forest floors for centuries.” And Jackie’s chicken with lemon and herbs has given me an idea for our supper this week.

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