A Particularly Strong Clue

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Helen and Bill dropped in just before lunch bringing a pair of splendid engraved cut glass goblets for our wedding present. We enjoyed conversation over coffee. Elizabeth came for lunch. I left the gathering briefly to engage in a Screen View session with James Peacock, of Peacock Computers, who managed to solve the problem I had experienced in changing my profile picture to one that Becky had produced at Rachel and Gareth’s recent wedding.

My post ‘Cottenham Park’ contains the story of the teenage accident to my left eye that was to necessitate a cataract operation about 25 years ago. At the time of the operation I was warned that future deterioration would be likely to require later laser treatment. Believing that time to have arrived I kept an appointment at Boots Opticians in New Milton this afternoon. My diagnosis was confirmed and a referral is to be made for surgery. Interestingly, the optometrist was able to see those old stitches in the affected eye. This was a history lesson for him, because sutures are no longer used. He had never seen them before.

Jackie and Elizabeth came along with me, waited in Costa’s for me to finish, then helped me select some new specs. Before returning to her own home, my sister presented us with a commissioned terra cotta sculpture for another nuptial gift. She has herself begun pottery classes and commissioned this piece from her tutor.

Aaron sculpture 1Aaron sculpture 4Aaron sculpture 2

Taking his references from photographs on this blog, John Cook, the sculptor, had produced this superbly detailed portrait. Here is a link to John’s site: http://picbear.com/morpheus_ceramics

Aaron sculpture 3

Should any of my regular readers be at a loss as to the subject’s identity, this image contains a particularly strong clue.

This evening we dined on Thai fish cakes, served on a bed of sautéed onions and peppers with savoury rice.

I drank Castelmaure Corbieres 2015 and Jackie drank Hoegaarden – in our new goblets. As Helen had hoped, the J glass took a whole bottle of the recipient’s favoured Belgian beer.

 

Destruction Of Tulips

When I was ill earlier in the year, our friends Margery and Paul gave me a copy of ‘Winespeak’, Ronald Searle’s illustrated ‘Wicked World of Winetasting’. The author, a highly original artist, claims that ‘All the phrases in this little book have been plucked from unacknowledged but absolutely authentic sources’. Souvenir Press’s 1983 edition presents Searle’s ( until I insisted, WordPress changed this to Seattle) grotesque caricatures alongside his chosen phrases. Here is one example:Winespeak illustration This is an excellent coffee table book. I dipped into it again last night. This morning Jackie drove me to our G.P.’s surgery in Milford on Sea, where the practice nurse removed my stitches. As, razor sharp unpicker poised, she approached my hand, she said, ‘I think I’ll get my glasses’. ‘Please do’, I laughingly replied. She explained that she didn’t really need them, but found that the off-the-counter pair beautifully magnified the knotted spiky strands of stiff line sticking out of my hand as if it were a pin-cushion. The wavy course of the blue material looked like a design for my Mum’s cross-stitching. This filled me with confidence, and she carried out a perfect operation, slipping the tiny knife under the tight knots, slicing through the thread, and drawing out any hidden residue with her gentle fingers. As my palm is rather scenic, and thinking that a description of the procedure presents the picture, I will spare my readers a photograph. Sea and thrift Today’s gale force winds were running at about 40 m.p.h. when we made this trip. On the way back we stopped and parked by the cliff top. In order to photograph the violent seas below, I braced myself, attempting to remain upright against the gusts tearing across The Solent. The thrift clung to the ground far more securely than I did. I wasn’t about to stand too close to the edge. Actually, I couldn’t really see what I was doing. By mid afternoon the gusts reached more than 50 m.p.h., Japanese maple  setting the Japanese maples aflame, foliage flickering in the sunlight.

Aquilegias and bluebells

Some flowers, such as aquilegias partnering bluebells in enforced fandango, survived the gales.

Sheltered

Mimulus

mimulus

Libertia

and libertia simply basked in warmth.

Clematis Natcha

The clematis Natcha, gyrating wildly, nevertheless kept its head.

Not so those tulips that, yesterday, had stood proud atop their chimney pot.

Tulips 1

When we left at 9.30 this morning, they had begun to shed petals,

Tulips 3

by lunchtime revealing their stamens,

Tulips 4

becoming even more exposed as the afternoon progressed.

By 6.30 p.m., when we left with Elizabeth, Danni, and Andy to dine at Spice of India, this is what was left of them:Tulips 5

On the left of this picture stands a crinodendron hookerianum, otherwise known as the Chilean lantern tree. It will soon be in bloom. (Last year I erroneously termed this the Chinese lantern tree.)

The food and service at the restaurant, owned by Andy’s friend Sid, was excellent. My starter was succulent prawn puri, and my main course Naga chicken with special rice. I drank Cobra. I didn’t really take in what the others had.

Putting Readers In The Picture

Some of my more recent followers were rather shocked by yesterday’s post. Those who have read my offerings over a longer period will possibly have been prepared by ‘My Branch Of The Family Tree’. It may now be worth explaining that the production of ‘Becky’s Book of Seasons’ was one way of dealing with my grief. The whole piece is a metaphor for life’s ups and downs, and for the value of hope. This morning’s amble round the garden revealed a number of newcomers, such as; Cranesbill geranium

cranesbill geraniums,

Rhododendron 1

the first of the rhododendrons,

Rhododendron 2

with its entourage of white daffodils,

Flowering cherry

and a new flowering cherry.

Some plants are now even more profuse. These include:

Forget-me-nots

flourishing forget-me-nots,

Onion flowers

undulating swathes of white onions that, until disillusioned by Jackie I thought were albino

Spanish bluebells

Spanish bluebells springing from the soil.

Violas

Tough little violas, somewhat chewed, have nevertheless survived the winter,

Azalea

and the transported azalea is now in full bloom.

Stitches in handThis morning Jackie drove me to Hythe hospital for a physiotherapy appointment on my hand. A very careful, affable, and efficient young physiotherapist rejoicing in the name of Sapphire had the task of removing my plaster; examining the stitches; changing my dressing; writing down a couple of exercises for me; and altering the venue for my next appointment to Lymington which is much nearer. The stitches are not due to be removed for another week. Sapphire was pleasantly surprised by what she found, saying that I healed well, which was some consolation. One of the prescribed exercises involves making a fist with the injured hand. After three hours I could do so quite effectively. Bearing in mind that the top joint of the third finger has been incapable of bending ever since I broke it playing rugby about thirty five years ago, I think the next picture demonstrates this. It is to be hoped that the delicate shade of pink chosen for my nail varnish is appreciated.Fist in bandage

Out of consideration for my more squeamish readers, almost foregoing the wordplay of the thumbnail option, I have published a medium image of the stitches. Those who wish to inspect the decorative needlework, may wish to click on the image to enlarge it.

Gorse - Version 2

As we drove across the heathland on Beaulieu Road I felt like an Israelite following Moses across the Red Sea. On either side of the forest road waves of gorse billowed across the landscape sending golden spray crashing onto the division between them.

Stopping in Lymington on the way back, we sampled the set lunch menu at Lal Quilla. This was excellent. For £6.95 each we chose onion bhajis from a range of starters; prawn pasanda for Jackie, and prawn jalfrezi for me, each with pilau rice, from a choice of four main courses; and ice cream. The portions were the same quantity and as well cooked as we are accustomed to in the evenings. Jackie drank diet coke. My beverages were an interesting arrangement. The barrel ran out of Kingfisher whilst the waiter tried to pour me some. He held up a pint glass which was mostly filled with head, and offered me bottled Bangla or Cobra instead. I chose Bangla. Later, he brought me the Kingfisher, now settled to a good half pint. ‘Complimentary’, he said with a smile. This was more than I would have wished to drink, but it would have been churlish to refuse, so I didn’t.

I am not sure that I didn’t drop off to sleep this afternoon before Danni and Andy popped in for a visit, which was very welcome and enjoyable. Such are the geography and timetables of modern life that these casual social activities are generally a thing of the past, which is a shame.

This evening Jackie’s triple decker club sandwiches with sparkling water was more than ample sustenance.