En Route To Cornwall

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE. REPEAT IF NECESSARY.

Fence

A.P. Maintenance, in the form of Aaron and Robin, this morning, almost finished the fence they have built  between our garden and that of North Breeze.

Hanging basket

On the way through to the gate to the back drive, I enjoyed the early morning sunlight blazing through this hanging basket,

Thrush

and managed to spot a well-camouflaged dunnock before it took off from the back of a chair.

I took a trip with Aaron to Mole Country supplies to buy more timber. We always have a convivial chat on these occasions, and I am transported in time to my father’s removal van, which contained such familiar clutter and carried the similar evocative odour of petrol and tobacco.

Rose Sawfly larvae

Jackie made a great sacrifice until this afternoon. She refrained from delivering death to a cluster of rose sawfly larvae until I had managed to capture a reasonable shot of these squirming creatures busily engaged in reducing the leaves of Crême de la crême to projecting spikes.

Rose Garden entrance

Entering The Rose Garden I reflected that it bears just one example of Jackie’s signage.

Just as the sun was setting this evening, Mat, Tess, and Poppy arrived for an overnight stay en route to Cornwall.

Tess and Poppy 1Tess and Poppy 2Tess and Poppy 3

Tess lost no time in introducing her daughter to the garden.

Jackie then fed us on gammon steak, mashed potato and swede, sweet potato, roasted vegetables, carrots, runner beans, and piquant cauliflower cheese. Needless to say, this was all cooked perfection. Jackie drank Hoegaarden, and Tess and I finished the merlot.

Published by derrickjknight

I am a septuagenarian enjoying rambling physically and photographing what I see, and rambling in my head as memories are triggered. I also ramble through a lifetime's photographs

60 thoughts on “En Route To Cornwall

  1. That’s the dinner I would like when I visit, please 🙂

    I love the image of Poppy looking directly at her poppy, with a hint of a smile 🙂

  2. Another series of lovely photographs. I am impressed by the shot of the larvae though I must say I am not particularly fond of the creatures in real life.

    1. Gammon (from French: jambon) is a leg-cut of ham/cured pork, cooked and served in relatively thin (half-a cm) slices. Our favourite is with a pineapple ring accoutrement (if cooked with this on top of the meat, the fruit juice runs out and creates a sticky glaze, what might be known as a “jus” in trendy cooking terms. Does the Head Cook agree with this?)

      1. “Steak” sounds more substantial than this, and it may be that some diners prefer a much thicker slice than we do. I can’t recall ever being served one thick enough to warrant the label “steak”.

      2. That ham ‘steak’ and pineapple sounds just like something my Mother used to cook for dinner as a treat some 50 years ago. The sweet sticky juice was just wonderful.

  3. Unless Aaron is on a different version of tobacco from his partner’s (Robin?), I doubt it was Pure Virginia you were reminded of…  !

  4. “… managed to spot a well-camouflaged thrush… ” so well camouflaged, it’s a dunnock/hedge-sparrow (grey head distinctive).

  5. I’ve never before encountered cauli cheese served as a “side” dish to a main. I’d always eaten/cooked it as a main in itself. Interesting idea, but tricky to time with all the other cooking going on.

  6. I love the entrance to your rose garden… I wish I could walk there, but it’s lovely to be able to have these virtual wanders.

  7. Like Val above, I wish I could go for a walk in your garden too. It must feel like magic walking through when the flowers are all at their best and the air is filled with the various aromatic essences.

  8. Isn’t it amazing how a scent can transport you to a particular place? Poppy has changed tremendously since the last pictures. She’s looking bright eyed and sweet.

  9. I like the way you photograph the details rather than taking snapshots of views. The photos of Poppy are lovely.

  10. I wish we could know exactly what babies were thinking. They sometimes have such profound expressions. By the way, the bird is a Dunnock or Hedge Sparrow. A thrush is quite a bit bigger with a pale underside.

  11. I’ve been struggling to identify a grasshopper from a photo all weekend so I sympathise with your ID problems.

    Sawfly larvae ate our gooseberry bushes again this year, but it was a good photo despite the associations.

    😉

  12. What a delightful feast and wonderful guests, Derrick and Jackie! The basket with sunlight shining through it was my favourite shot! Lovely rose garden photo, you two are somehow keeping up with the neverending battle of weeds and deadheads. 🙂

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