Chickens And A Calf

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE IN THE GROUP TO ACCESS ENLARGED GALLERY

Last night Flo transferred several photographs from her mobile phone to my iMac.

On 28th December I had photographed our granddaughter photographing chickens at Hockey’s Farm. These were her images.

Fortune cookies

Yesterday evening we had enjoyed fortune cookies given to Jackie by Mr Chan at Hordle Chinese Take Away. Flo pictured the mottos, including the touch of curry on mine. For some reason the idea of me making a sudden rise caused a certain amount of hilarity.

Branch Line001

The Branch Line To Selsey from Chichester enjoyed barely four decades of life. This is the front cover of a fascinating book published in 1983, giving its detailed story. Barrie Haynes had given me the book a few months ago after Jackie, Ian, Becky, and I had visited a mortgage adviser in the locality. Today I finished reading it.

The authors have thoroughly researched their material and presented it in an entertaining form. Their close scrutiny of contemporary photographs alert the reader to details they may otherwise have missed. Useful maps, tickets, and timetables supplement the illustrations.

Branch Line002

I have chosen a few of the photographs in an attempt to demonstrate the flavour of the work. Edwardian days were just a century ago.

Branch Line003

The text beneath the upper of these two images shows how freight was more profitable than passengers. What is happening in the lower picture is described on the facing page. The Hesperus is ‘in trouble’. Β A lifting of the train and a complicated adjustment of a ‘belligerent rail’ was required to help the 17 1/4 ton engine on its way.

Branch Line005

Ralph Selsby was one of several carriers operating from Selsey.

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Here are a couple of carriages from the early 1930s. The line was closed in 1935.

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This is what constituted a railway replacement bus in 1910.

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Just 16 years later, this bus was to herald the death knell of the historic little line.

This evening we all enjoyed more of Jackie’s excellent chicken and egg curries, samosas, and onion bahjis. Mrs Knight drank Hoegaarden, and I drank Wolf’s Leap merlot 2016, another very good wine from Ian’s case.

 

 

43 thoughts on “Chickens And A Calf

  1. A fascinating piece of local history, Derrick. Perhaps that hot curry you spilt gave you the forecast ‘rise’ by making you leap out of your chair and spill it on your fortune cookie!?

  2. My husband is very interested in trains and rail travel, past and present and we have a good library of books like yours. I find them fascinating – not just the information about the trains and tracks but also the fashions of the time, the other modes of transport and also the fact that people appeared to take pride in their work no matter how menial.

  3. The ones promising β€˜sudden rise’ and journey to a far-off destination are interesting. Perhaps Jackie will take a trip to New Zealand one of these days! The excerpts form the story of the railway line have been carefully chosen. Could it be the fortune cookie was referring to this journey in time? The emergency bus service is amusing!

  4. I must admit to a slightly indecorous snort when I saw your Fortune laid out – and it wasn’t the curry that provoked it! I always love to see the wife referred to by her official title πŸ™‚

  5. Don’t you just love this history! For Christmas I received a book on the island I was born on and both my parents grew up on! Love all the old photos. A picture of Smitty’s boat rental and spotted my godfather in another one!

  6. Chickens, history, and fortunes. Great post, Derrick!
    The authors of the book seem to have done a great deal of research on that railway line. Great photos.
    We sadly missed our decades-long tradition of Chinese food with friends on New Year’s Eve, but I’m hoping for good fortunes soon. Thanks for sharing yours. I may have chuckled at the “rise.” πŸ™‚

  7. I miss trains. If I were queen, there would definitely be a resurgence of train travel, rail road construction, and a general slowing down of the fast lane. That way we would all have sudden opportunities to rise – to see and contemplate the world around us again.

  8. That loco got me going, My Classic British Steam Locomotive bible has no mention of this class of loco, But I Google search tells me that there were plenty of 2-4-2 locos made in Victorian times, not only in England but in Europe and the US of A, Fascinatinfg stuff, thanks Derrick. πŸ˜€

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