A Year For Honesty

Today the weather was fairly gloomy. Early rain gave way to overcast clouds and oppressive warmth. Our own garden seemed the best venue.

Bees, nevertheless, were busy plundering the amanogawa cherry now in full bloom.

Tulips, which, until now have kept their collars tightly buttoned, are beginning to think about loosening their ties.

Avian courting continues in the weeping birch.

The golden Japanese maple glows despite the lack of sunshine.

Dicentra joins primulas, hellebores, daffodils, fritillaries, and honesty in the West Bed.

Honesty is a biennial bloomer. The transparent medallion-shaped seed pods, so attractive when backlit in the autumn, as effective as a careless sneeze, scatter the germs that raise these spires of colour everywhere in the spring. This is its year.

The daffodils in the above photograph of the Cryptomeria Bed are later blooms which will delight for some weeks more. Others are past their best.

The vinca is a plant which, given free rein, would dance over all the beds and consequently requires a certain amount of containment. When we first arrived the garden was choked with it.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s flavoursome sausage casserole; creamy mashed potato; crunchy carrots and cauliflower; and tender green beans, with which she drank Hoegaarden and I drank more of the Juicy Assemblage.

78 thoughts on “A Year For Honesty

  1. …..Tulips, which, until now have kept their collars tightly buttoned, are beginning to think about loosening their ties.!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    What a wonderful description๐Ÿค—

    Thank you Derrick for the beauty you sharing to us!!!!

  2. Tulips, which, until now have kept their collars tightly buttoned, are beginning to think about loosening their ties.!!!!!!

    What a wonderful description๐Ÿค—

    Thank you Derrick for the beauty you sharing with us!!!

  3. Terrific alternative to a ride in the countryside. Everything is blooming beautifully – taking advantage of what we consider “bad” weather no doubt.

  4. Derrick you have a beautiful garden. Sadly, unlike my late mother who was a gifted gardener, I donโ€™t possess so much as a green fingernail! Now I just have a terrace with pots full of succulents which thrive on my indifference and neglect.

  5. Honesty is a biennial bloomer. Is the sarcastic pun intentional or itโ€™s the handiwork of my sickly consciousness? Gorgeous photographs that go hand in hand with glittering commentary.

  6. So beautiful! Your words, your photos, your garden!
    Love the buzzin’ bees and courtin’ birds!
    ‘Tis a very cold Spring day here and very rainy…so your post brings smiles and warmth! Thank you! ๐Ÿ™‚
    HUGS!!! to you and EXTRA HUGS to The Head Gardener!!! ๐Ÿ™‚

  7. “Tulips, which, until now have kept their collars tightly buttoned, are beginning to think about loosening their ties.” Wonderful, Derrick! A wonderful simile. Or do I mean metaphor? How I wish our English teachers had been better at keeping my interest.

  8. I’m sure you could spend many days wandering that garden without needing to visit more distant places. ๐Ÿ™‚ Beautiful shots.

    A short time ago i was looking to identify a plant that had white leaves so i tried googling for it – to no avail. Lo and behold the very sort of plant i was looking for is shining brightly beneath your dicentra (which are wonderful – i love that capture you took! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Would you or Jackie be kind enough to give me their name if it is known? – The one with white leaves with the green border, creeping plant.

    Many thanks in advance. ๐Ÿ™‚

  9. I love Honesty seedheads. Last year, I didnโ€™t get any flowers but the herb garden is graced now – and like you weโ€™ve got some late-flowering daffodils!

    Your Honesty display looks very good with the surrounding plants.

  10. The spring gardens are beautiful, Derrick and Jackie, especially that cherry tree! Our fruit trees are slowly coming into bloom here. Oppressive warmth is something we are not experiencing, yet.

  11. “Tulips, which, until now have kept their collars tightly buttoned, are beginning to think about loosening their ties.” Excellent! It makes me want to draw a cartoon.

    I had to look up honesty. My mom had a money plant, which I think this might be. I had no idea it had such pretty flowers.

    Here’s a question for the head gardener: Plants like these that come up wherever they please: do you leave them be? Do you dig up the errant ones early and put them where you’d like them better? For so many years I was just happy to have anything other than weeds grow, so I left things be. But now I am wanting to put a bit of shape into the scene. I like a carefree look, but I also like a cared-for look.

    • You have described exactly Jackie’s attitude – i.e. same as yours. When I read the digging up early sentence she said, as I knew she would, ‘certainly’. She takes many from the gravel paths, and has a talent for recognising plants when very small. Thanks very much, Jodie.

  12. What a wonderful wander through your rainy-day garden – in words as well as pictures. I think plants often glow more in dull light. This was a delight, Derrick, thank you! ๐Ÿ™‚

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