From The Passenger Seat

This morning Jackie and I drove to The Oakhaven Hospice Trust furniture warehouse on the Ampress industrial estate in order to offer for collection a Chinese oak cabinet which is now surplus to our requirements.

I took the opportunity to photograph the parched condition of the surrounding verges.

The now golden moorland around Brockenhurst was tinged with purple heather, yellowing bracken, and early autumnal trees.

The usual ponies had deserted the arid Longslade Bottom

for such sheltered spots as they could find among the lanes

and the dappled woodland.

Plants were drying along the verges of Hordle Lane and

Christchurch Road at the point at which it runs alongside our house, the front garage trellis of which has been saved from suffering a similar fate by Flo and Dillon’s valiant irrigation.

With the exception of the first and last all these photographs were produced from the front passenger seat.

This evening we dined on pizza and fresh salad with which Jackie drank Hoegaarden, Flo and Dillon drank Ribena, and I drank Château La Mauberte Bordeaux 2020.

Published by derrickjknight

I am an octogenarian enjoying rambling physically and photographing what I see, and rambling in my head as memories are triggered. I also ramble through a lifetime's photographs. In these later years much rambling is done in a car.

63 thoughts on “From The Passenger Seat

  1. How is your leg today?
    Continued healing wishes for you.
    Even in the dry and parched land nature offers some colours…some hope.
    Hoping hoping hoping you all get rain soon.
    Love the way the sun and shadows are playing a game of “tag” in your photos today…they are creating some beautiful masterpieces of art for you to photograph. 🙂
    (((HUGS))) ❤️

  2. Good work from a sitting position.

    The state of your countryside looks dire. You must be keeping your fingers crossed that no one gets careless with a portable barbecue. It is quite dry enough to be alarming here, but you look a lot worse.

  3. These photographs could have been taken in South Africa, where it is always rather frightening to experience such drought before the onset of autumn after which the chances of any rain diminish rapidly. The heat, drought and the dry conditions seem dire and I hope there will be a degree of relief before long. Winter is clinging on at present – with a few beautifully mild days in between. I hope there is supplementary feeding for the horses.

  4. I can report that the ponies on Exmoor are in fine condition, but then the streams on the moor are (mainly) all still running. The moor is dry, but not as much as the New Forest or here in Berkshire. We spent several days up on the high moor, by streams and rivers, loving the sound of waterfalls……..

  5. My heart just ached for the dear horses and ponies. What natural instinct to seek shelter under the shade of trees and along the fence. It has been like that here also. We have had a horrible summer. Only this week we are having some relief from severe heat and high temperatures. I read where some of the roads in England were having problem with the tar melting. That used to happen in India sometimes, especially in the North.
    Beautiful photography, so picturesque despite the dry and barren land.
    Don’t know what happened to your leg, hope it is healing very well.

    1. I strained the leg a few days ago. I don’t know how, but I don’t think it is serious. I remember the summer of 1947 when playing in the street I retuned home covered in tar from the roads. I’m pleased you have some relief – we are due some next week – whether that will include rain remains to be seen. Thanks very much, Zakiah

      1. I wish we would get some rain soon. The temperatures have levelled off here. But the lawns in the front and back need some rain soon. The sprinkler just doesn’t do the trick of a good solid downpour.
        Hope your weather improves soon and the horses feel happy. 🙂

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