Late Summer Blooms

On a balmy late-summer morning I took my camera around the garden seeking auguries of the true autumn as opposed to the false one we experienced as a consequence of the heatwave of a month ago.

We have two crab apple trees in the front garden, the fruit of which have, until last winter, nourished our blackbirds throughout the colder months. During the last such season they eschewed these offerings. It remains to be seen whether these members of the Malus genus will this year fall untasted to the ground.

This blue lace cap hydrangea is borne by a regenerated stem on a plant apparently finished for the year.

Varieties of wilting phlox have also rejuvenated,

as have drought-dried dahlias, while

blooming begonias burgeon once more.

Dwarf sunflowers grown from seed have emerged from the soil.

Pale lilac colchicums, or autumn crocuses, nod to their season,

as do Rosa Glauca hips

and the barren seed heads of some clematises.

Virginia creeper’s mantle draping the south wall of the back drive is turning to its warm autumnal hues.

Crown Princess Margareta continues climbing over the rose garden covered bench,

and Special Anniversary has come round again.

White solanum and purple clematis clamber over the dead elm trunk.

This evening Jackie drove us all over to Spice Cottage in Westbourne where we dined with Becky and Ian. Flo, Dillon, and Ellie remained to stay with our daughter and son-in-law for a couple of nights.

I will feature this event with a couple of photographs tomorrow.

Published by derrickjknight

I am an octogenarian enjoying rambling physically and photographing what I see, and rambling in my head as memories are triggered. I also ramble through a lifetime's photographs. In these later years much rambling is done in a car.

77 thoughts on “Late Summer Blooms

  1. Your photographs are just gorgeous. Each flower looks beautifully bright and healthy, which I’m sure is down to the careful nurturing you and Jackie have provided.

  2. That’s a bumper crop of rose hips! Homemade rose hip jelly and crab apple jelly were a tradition in my family when I was growing up. The Virginia creeper is another prime example of nature’s perfect patterns.

  3. It looks as though autumn is still standing on tiptoes, tapping on summer’s shoulder. Same in Maine, but I expect we are a bit ahead of you. You’ll have a couple of quiet days with the young family away.

  4. So much to enjoy here. I had no idea there are autumn crocuses; what a lovely addition to the season. And that white Solanum is quite something. I just found some of our native whites last weekend: Solanum carolinense. And of course we also have the Virginia Creeper. I think it’s one of the prettiest autumn reds.

    1. Bitter, but the fruit can be used for jam and left for squirrels and birds to enjoy. Flowering crab apple trees are generally planted more for their springtime blossoms, which are nicely scented. My guess is English gardeners plant them for the same reasons. (I live in the USA.)

  5. Luscious photos, Derrick, and lucid, lyrical lines. I may have to steal (with credit) “auguries of true autumn.” πŸ™‚ I wonder why the blackbirds stopped eating the crabapples?

    Your house will be quiet for a few days.

  6. Hi Derrick, what a most beautiful garden you have, love all your flowers, and the Virginia creeper has such beautiful colours! Autumn is such a lovely and colourful season 😊

  7. What lovely photos of your beautiful flowers, Derrick. Hard to choose a favorite. But, there something so fragile and sweet about those wilting phlox that have rejuvenated – I am drawn to them. And of course, the Crown Princess Margareta always has been a favorite. I’m so glad you teach us the names of all these lovely flowers. Thank you, Derrick!

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