She Powdered Her Face

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE. REPEAT IF REQUIRED.

Today’s weather would have blessed any Summer’s day. It was warm and sunny, and Jackie and I raised a sweat as we continued weeding, planting, and lopping. I use ‘we’ loosely. I mainly tidied up after the real work. We transported the two full orange bags of cuttings to the dump, and later almost completely refilled one of them.

Clematis 2Clematis Passion FlowerClematis 3Clematis 1

Clematises are now bursting out all over. The first two depicted here are Niobe and Passion Flower. I can’t name the others.

Rose Summer Time

Roses like creamy golden Summer Time,

Roses Summer Wine and Madame Alfred CariereRoses Summer Wine and Madame Alfred Carriere 2

white Madame Alfred Carriere, and glowing pink Summer Wine clamber up structures in

Rose Garden

the Rose Garden, over one corner of which Altissimo dances the tightrope.

Compassion roses

while Compassion rewards us for clearing its space over

Garden view from patio along Dead End path.

the Dead End Path.

Hollyhocks

Foxgloves

Geranium Palmatum

and geranium palmatums are beginning to prepare us for their annual profusion.

Diascia

Diascas,

Bidens

bidens,

Marguerites

and marguerites are just three of the plants carefully positioned in a variety of containers.

Butterfly Painted Lady on erigeron

A Painted Lady who had definitely seen better days powdered her face in the erigeron pollen.

This evening we dined on spicy chicken kebabs, plain boiled rice, and plentiful salad. Jackie drank Hoegaarden and I drank Cabillero de Diablo, reserva cabernet sauvignon  2015.

46 thoughts on “She Powdered Her Face

  1. Love the header picture of the painted lady in the erigeron flowers – two of my favourite things 🙂 The thing I most love about Jackie’s garden is that wherever the eye wanders there is something to arrest it. The rusty white painted birdcage grabbed my attention today and I had to biggify to inspect it. Is that dried grasses poking out the top? The tub of marguerites is looking lovely too, I planted one in the autumn and am hoping for a fine showing next summer – though at the rate I am progressing with my courtyard tidy up that might be all I have! 🙂

  2. The niobe clematis is wonderful! Madame Alfred Carriere is the only rose (and Iceberg) that I know by name! (But Foxglove, Derrick – not Hollyhock!!) Your garden is an absolute delight!

  3. Luxuriant, and the Painted Lady retains enough beauty to make it worth her paying attention to her makeup!
    The garden borders seem to be beautifully concealed by plants.

  4. Lovely pictures – I’m now more conscious than ever that the year is passing me by. I think “we” is fair enough – without your clearing activities the garden would soon be knee deep in debris.

  5. I didn’t need the very catchy title to launch myself into your flowery posts, but this did stop my breath:

    A Painted Lady who had definitely seen better days powdered her face in the erigeron pollen.

  6. I wanted to call my youngest daughter Marguerite but it was vetoed (can’t remember now and it doesn’t matter … didn’t matter from the moment she arrived)) but she has always been known as Daisy-Flower even thought it isn’t her name. Marguerites in all their lovely incarnations are ever my favourite of favourites. 😊

  7. What a lovely expression! I was initially on the watch out for a lady before I finally realised you were talking about a butterfly 😀
    Beautiful photography as usual 🙂

  8. The gardens are lovely, Derrick and Jackie. I love the clematises! We have a deep purple one here I had to move this spring. It is finally coming back from the roots.

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