Sparrows To The Right Of Us, Sparrows To The Left Of Us

IMAGES MAY BE ENLARGED WITH A CLICK THAT CAN BE REPEATED

Lilies

This afternoon I wandered around the garden seeking flowers I may not yet have featured this year. These lilies have just popped in a patio planter.

Agapanthus

The agapanthuses in the Palm Bed again stretch across the Gazebo Path.

Rudbeckia and phlox

They stand alongside these Rudbeckia and phlox;

Begonias

while on that bed’s Shady Path side these begonias bloom.

Dahlia Puerto Rico

This flamboyant dahlia, aptly named Puerto Rico blazes between Brick and Gazebo Paths.

Clematis

The arch across the Shady Path supports this purple clematis.

Fuchsia Mrs Popple

In the Rose Garden we have fuchsias Mrs Popple

Fuchsia Bella Rosella

and Bella Rosella.

Gloriana

Gloriana rose is having a better year;

Special Anniversary rose

while Special Anniversary

Crown Princess Margareta rose

and Crown Process Margareta are enjoying a second flush.

Hydrangea

Jackie bought this rather splendid hydrangea very cheaply in Lidl this morning. It doesn’t have a name. You can’t expect everything for Β£5. She will nurture it in the pot until the weather is kinder.

Sparrows' nest

Now to the sparrows. I have reported on the second brood of these birds in the loo extractor fan. keeping their parents foraging. We have a second set in the rusted burglar alarm on the other side. These are not visible, but I can assure you that they make as much noise as their not so distant cousins.

This evening the three of us dined on a rack of pork ribs in barbecue sauce and Jackie’s sublime savoury rice. Mrs. Knight drank Hoegaarden and Elizabeth and I finished the Malbec.

52 thoughts on “Sparrows To The Right Of Us, Sparrows To The Left Of Us

  1. Little birds, loud voices! Clamoring for food. Speaking of which…that description of dinner made my mouth water.

  2. That dinner sounds particularly yummy – and I missed breakfast this morning too! The thrushes are just starting to make a noise around here, which heralds the beginning of nest building season. A bit early, but I don’t mind πŸ™‚ That lacy hydrangea is my favourite!

  3. Beautiful flowers. I love the lilies and the flamboyant dahlia. My only regret is that I can’t smell the roses. Malbec is my favorite.

  4. Gorgeous flowers! I was wondering why I hadn’t seen posts from you and lo and behold, WordPress very nicely unfollowed you. They’re becoming impossible with this.

    How are you feeling?

  5. I’m so envious of your beautiful garden that you get to enjoy all through the growing season. This time of year mine looks so bedraggled and colorless thanks the to onslaught of insanely high temperatures. Not to mention the fact that it’s so untidy and weed consumed because I can’t get out in it to do anything to help it right now. So your photos and garden are an oasis that I love to come to at the end of my day. Pray you are well, my friemd. Love, N πŸ™‚ ❀

  6. Magnificent photos as ever. You have turned me into a floral sophomore. I can imagine the warbling of your winged friends filling up your mornings and evenings. Framing of the shots say a lot about your knee and postures.

  7. Your flowers are breathtaking! and your photos of them are delightful! πŸ™‚

    OH, I’m so happy to hear about the sparrows! So you have sparrows in stereo? πŸ˜€
    I hope all the noisy babies grow up and fly away to wonderful lives! πŸ™‚

    Best wishes for your continued healing and recovery, Derrick!

    HUGS!!! πŸ™‚

  8. How could you miss featuring such beauties? I think I fertilized my hydrangea a little too much. It makes huge leaves, but small blossoms. I think I need the Head Gardener to come straighten out my gardening habits for me, Derrick!!

  9. How much Hoegaarden does the culinary queen go through? Is it one of those staples on the shopping list along with bread and milk?

  10. I know sparrows are a nuisance, but they are still a very pretty little thing.
    By the way, it might interest you to know that in some parts of Victoria, Agapanthus has been declared a pest and must be eradicated. It doesn’t appear to have had much response from gardeners.

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