How Many Centuries?

Jackie drove me to Lymington where I spent the morning in the EE showroom. I had been two days without a service on O2. There is no other supplier’s showroom within several miles of us, and I could not telephone O2.

Cutting a long story short, I decided to transfer to EE, where it is possible to speak to a real person in an accessible building. My old Samsung, a good 10 years old, is now obsolete, so I also upgraded to the current model.

Miraculously, my O2 account worked this afternoon.

Late this afternoon, we took a short forest drive.

I stepped out on Holmsley Passage

and photographed autumn bracken in surrounding woodland

and undulating landscape.

Voices of the two young women on the winding road had carried way up the hill behind me.

Further on, I wondered for how many centuries had shafts of sunlight outlined the mossy mounds of the ancient hedgerow banks along Bisterne Close, or

the backs of generations of smiling young pigs, 

gleefully guzzling

acorns on the steep slopes leading out of Burley.

This evening we dined on second helpings of last night’s takeaway with the same beverages.

Published by derrickjknight

I am an octogenarian enjoying rambling physically and photographing what I see, and rambling in my head as memories are triggered. I also ramble through a lifetime's photographs. In these later years much rambling is done in a car.

75 thoughts on “How Many Centuries?

  1. I was vastly relieved to finally come across the name Samsung. At first, your references to O2 suggested that you’d been put on oxygen, and were suffering some sort of physical malady. Now I have it sorted — enjoy that new technology!

  2. I used to hate updating to new phones and providers but since everything can be transferred on the spot, I takes no time to get comfortable again.

    The pigs look too busy to notice you.

  3. The top shot is my very favourite and I am delighted that it features so often (I’m not too sure what EE means and neither O2 but I guess it is to do with your phonus mobilis)

  4. I enjoyed the play of light and shadow in these photos. The passage reminded me of “The Long and Winding Road,” one of my favorite songs. It’s often better to speak to a real person in an accessible building, especially when phones and technology are involved.

  5. Lovely photos! I, too, prefer nature over technology!
    I’m glad you got the phone stuff dealt with. (Sorry for my using such a technical word…”stuff”…HA! 😉 😀 )
    The pretty pigs look overtly oblivious to your tech troubles! 😉 😛
    (((HUGS))) 🙂 ❤️
    PS…Years ago when I took my old “dinosaur ancient” phone in to trade up, the young man in the store called over all the other young staff to see my old phone. I said, “Are you saying my phone is ancient?” and he replied, my staff have probably heard of this kind of phone but they’ve never seen one. HA! 😀

  6. It’s certainly acorn time. They’re everywhere here in Surrey too. Coincidentally, I’m also trying to arrange a transfer from O2 to EE – purely for convenience of access to their services.

  7. I was confused by EE and O2, but I’m glad you have phone service. 🙂
    I love the colors of the “undulating landscape”–but then also the mossy green in the photo beneath it.
    Centuries indeed. I wonder how it has changed over time.

  8. Gorgeous photos, Derrick. Nature never disappoints except perhaps, when she’s angry. Technology definitely has its advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Fall in the Forest! I am glad the summer heat and drought are over for you. Enjoy the last warm days! I love the gleefully guzzling porkers. 🙂 Life goes on, century after century. We are surrounded by ghosts of what has come before.

  10. Hi Derrick, I was a little confused by O2 at first. I thought you were referring to oxygen cannisters. I have one for my dad for his bad days. I don’t think I’ve ever seen bracken. I know the term only from Enid Blyton’s books.

  11. Great pig picture. It just about sums technology up – mobile phones, WordPress and a bloke in his dining room commenting on the quality of your porcine portraiture. Where is the brave new world of robot butlers and quality leisure time with trips to Mars? Or did Dan Dare lie to me?

  12. it’s kind of funny how mechanical gadgets get to us in the end… I can’t ever remember my folks replacing our telephones in the 50s or even in the 60s when the dial sort arrived…let alone having problems with the dialling mechanism. OK, occasionally we would need a new toaster…

  13. I feel as though I recognize the mossy hedgerow in these shots. As well the hill on Holmsley Passage. It makes me happy to see things I recognize, even if it’s only through photos. That’s a great polka-dotted pig.

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