I Held One Back

Last night I finished reading:

One of Trollope’s shorter works, this deals with familiar themes concerning the status of women; socio-economic inequalities; intrigue and romantic entanglements. It is a tragic love story breaching differences in fortune, in social class, in geography, and in religion. As usual the prose flows along smoothly to the tale’s surprising, if inevitable, conclusion.

Given that the action takes place alternately in England and Ireland, the choice of the sensitive, and insightful Irish novelist and poet, Maeve Binchy to write the excellent introduction was most apt.

The generous quantity of Elisa Trimby’s drawings are faithful to the text. In particular she manages effectively to convey the emotions of her subjects. I was impressed with the appropriate flattening of perspective enabling her to depict a good depth of field.

In order not to give away the dénouement I have held back the last of the illustrations.

Much of this morning was devoid of Internet connection, which rather delayed my drafting of this review; and my listening to the England v. Sri Lanka men’s World Cup Cricket match.

In order to calm my nerves took a stroll round the garden.

The first two images of these day lilies are of those purchased from https://www.polliesdaylilies.co.uk which, containing our national collection, is situated very near to us.

These penstemons adorn Margery’s Bed.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s superb sausages in red wine; crisp new potatoes, carrots, and broccoli, with which she drank Hoegaarden and I finished the Pinot Noir.

63 thoughts on “I Held One Back

  1. *accusingly* I must have caught my internetlessitis from you!
    That book seems a pure delight. I do hope it doesn’t end with the protagonists flinging themselves over the scary cliffs, though.

  2. Incredible detail in those drawings! I’ve got a long list of Trollope’s books on my Audible wish list and am having trouble deciding on which one to choose. Any suggestions? (Currently I’m listening to Miriam Margolyes reading Bleak House and loving it. She reads aloud almost exactly as I read to myself)

    • Thanks very much, Pauline. This is an extract from an earlier post that you have read: ‘Last night I finished reading ‘Can You Forgive Her?’ by Anthony Trollope. Originally published in serial form, like other Victorian novels, this saga of family and politics was the forerunner of today’s television series. The book was the first of the Palliser sequence. It is longer than most readers would like in the modern world, but it repaid the time investment. I won’t give away any details, but can say that the author writes fluently and keeps us interested in the interrelated lives of his protagonists.’ A cousin of Jackie’s, a former Oxford University Prof, recommended I started with that.

  3. I have not read this. And it’s time to go back to Trollope. I read a number back to back in my early 30s and realized that was a bad idea as he has some stock characters that can get mixed up with characters in other books. So I always leave time between. But I do love his stories! And your Penstemons are really beautiful. I must look them up to see if they grow here.

  4. I really love Trollope’s work, recently, for our entertainment, we have watched BBC’s productions of some of his writings and we both enjoyed it very much. The illustrations of the book are wonderous though, nothing like holding the book in your hand is there!

  5. After looking at those illustrations, I checked our library catologue with no success. Though there are a few other books by Anthony Trollope. Have you read his other work?

  6. A garden stroll is always good for the body, mind, and soul! 🙂
    Thank you for sharing the Trollope book, and illustrations with us. They are so beautifully detailed, I can stare at them for so long!
    HUGS!!! 🙂

  7. So True, Ms Trimby’s drawings masterfully capture such great depth!

    I fully concur with Uma – the Day-lily and the penstamon are quite remarkably beautiful shots.

    Did i hear right? Is the UK about to experience a heat wave?? 36 degrees were mentioned?? Hope the garden shades are up?? 🙂

    Sorry about the cricket!!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

  8. Absolutely enchanting drawings Derrick, each on their own tells a story and each must be a perfect accompaniment to the written words, an excellent review on a book that takes us back into another time.

  9. The illustrations are extraordinary! I noticed that for some time now I have not been receiving your posts in my feed. That is odd. But at least I discovered it and re-followed you. That should fix the problem.

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