Wagons Ho!

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Roseraie de l'Hay staked

Beginning with roseraie de l’Hay, Jackie and I continued our work in the Rose Garden by bashing stakes into the ground and tying the stems to them. Brambles are very sneaky when they send their deep roots down beside roses. The worst of these, masquerading as  the rose, had to be dug out with a trowel and great care.

Rosa gallica and Laura Ford

Rosa gallica, here fronted by Laura Ford, also needed a lengthy stake;

Rose Lady Emma Hamilton

 shorter ones sufficed for Lady Emma Hamilton,

Festive Jewel staked

and Festive Jewel.

rose Laura Ford

Laura Ford,

Laura Ford, roseraie de l'Hay, and rosa gallica

standing between roseraie de l’Hay and rosa gallica,

Dog rose sport

had produced a rambling sport which we needed to remove from its cultivated host. New varieties are produced by grafting onto the wild rose stock. A tendency to revert to the original produces what is called a sport. This dog rose looks wonderful when flung over a hedgerow, but rather detracted from our plantings.

It probably envied Ballerina her gleeful dance celebrating her freedom to roam.

This afternoon we transported two large orange bags of garden clippings to the Efford Recycling Centre, then went for a drive in the forest.

Cyclist 1Cyclist 2

Sometimes we do find ourselves admiring cyclists who tackle the slopes with such splendid effort.

Cyclist, walkers, and cars

Here was another at Burley, climbing

Hill outside Burley

the hill above The Queen’s Head.

Walkers 1Walkers and dog

Walkers were also doing well with this.

Katherine Parr

We, on the other hand, were enjoying a drink in the front garden of the pub. Katherine Parr was the sixth wife of King Henry VIII, and the only one to survive him. It is, we think, her portrait that adorns the inn sign. (See Lord Beeri’s comments below. He is right to put the finger on Lady Jane Gray)

Strike out the first two guesses. Becky, in her comment below, has come up with the definitive answer, from https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/404444/elizabeth-i-when-a-princess.

Dragon on roof of A Coven of Witches

From this point we noticed the dragon on the roof of A Coven of Witches, thus combining the two myths upon which the prosperity of this village is built.

Mask

Even the Art Shop has a scary window.

Burley Wagon Rides 1Burley Wagon Rides 2Burley Wagon Rides 3
Burley Wagon Rides 4

We had stopped here because we could see that a Burley Wagon Ride was about to get under way.

Burley stump

On the approach to the car park, a tree was cut down some years ago. Someone obviously carved the name of the village into the stump. Only three and a half letters remain.

Ponies 1

No forest drive would be complete without at least one pony mooning in the middle of the road.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s deliscious chiken tikka, mushroom and onion rice topped with an omelette, and onion bahjis  She drank Peroni and I drank Isla Negra merlot 2016.

‘Did You See Those Chairs?’

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On another dull morning I scanned the last few colour slides from 1980.

Becky pushing pushchair 10.80 1

In October Becky enjoyed pushing the buggy in Tooting Common.

Becky pushing Sam in pushchair / Piper 10.80

Sam 10.80

There was someone in it. That was Sam.

Jessica and Becky pushing Sam 10.80

Jessica was also on the walk.

Matthew 11.804

Here is Matthew the following month,

Matthew and Sam 12.80Sam 12.80

and in December with Sam, who,

Sam 25.12.80 3

on 25th was helped by Michael to open his first Christmas presents,

Derrick and Sam 25.12.80

And, of course, we had a festive tree.

This afternoon we took a trip to New Milton to buy a posting tube for Pauline’s parcel, post it, and take a waistcoat to Johnson’s Cleaners. We began with the tube from the art suppliers. We made up the parcel outside the shop, parked a bit nearer the Post Office, and went our separate ways – Jackie to the cleaners and me to the Post Office.

Garden Chairs

On the way I walked past two garden chairs of the perfect size for me, displayed outside Hand Made New Forest. Following the invitation, I tried them, and found them to be extremely comfortable.

When Jackie met me outside the Post Office a short while later I asked ‘Did you see those chairs?’. ‘I saw them,’ she replied with a broad smile, ‘and I sat in them’. ‘Shall we get a pair?’ was my next unnecessary question. We ordered a couple, of a different colour.

By early evening the weather had cleared enough for us to take drinks in the rose garden, where

Roserie de la Haie

Roserie de la Haie is flourishing;

Rose Garden

and the mirror behind Golden Showers happily reflects the similar hued Laura Ford filling the gap between between the two levels of the climber.

This evening we dined on spicy pork with vegetable risotto, followed by profiteroles. Jackie drank Hoegaarden and I finished the malbec.

Traffic Control

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Most of our roses are now in bloom.

Rose Laura Ford

We have, for example, Laura Ford;

rose Summer Time

Summer Time;

Summer Wine 1rose Summer Wine 2

and, sharing the blue painted arch with Madame Alfred Carière, Summer Wine;

Front garden

whilst the pink ones at the front are beginning to festoon the trellis.

A couple of times in recent days, when we haven’t had time to stop, we have seen ponies in the forest attached to very young, limpet-like foals, their Pelham puppet legs only just out of the box. Today we went in search of some. For the first hour we saw none. It is a Bank Holiday weekend, and Jackie speculated that the parents had led their babies off into the forest for their protection from grockles and their groping fingers.

Cattle

All we encountered was lowing cattle leading their larger offspring across our path.

Pony and foal 1

Then, at last, on the moor along the Beaulieu/Brockenhurst road, our patience was rewarded.

Ponies and foal 2

This mare and her foal were part of a larger group, initially keeping their distance.

Ponies and foal 1

The mother decided to lead her infant away from the others,

Ponies and foal 2

but, despite an abrupt change of direction, couldn’t shake off the determined member of a smaller breed who was clearly well imprinted, so,

Pony and foal crossing road 1

Pony and foal crossing road 2

in a vain attempt to escape, she initiated her lanky infant into the arts of traffic control.

Pony crossing road

The rest of the team loyally followed.

Pony and foal 2

Further on, its mother close enough, another young pony dared to be inquisitive.

Foal

It jerked to its feet when she moved a few metres away, reached the safety of her flanks,

Pony and foal 3

and stood, chomping, alongside the mare.

This evening we dined at Royal China in Lymington, where we enjoyed the usual excellent food with very friendly service. We shared chicken satay, king prawns in a chilli sauce, and plain chow mein with bean shoots; and both drank Tsingtao beer.

Before And After: The Brick Path

Pansies

This morning Jackie continued her winter planting, such as this hanging basket and I pruned roses.

Here are today’s offerings from the rose garden:

Rose Laura Ford

Laura Ford,

Rose Golden Showers

and the climber, Golden Showers.

Gazebo Path sign

Following yesterday’s post, Jackie has given the Gazebo Path its correct sign.

This afternoon Jackie drove us to New Milton for me to visit the bank and to buy a return ticket to Nottingham in readiness for my trip to Louisa and Errol and the girls on Sunday.

I then prepared the next section of the saga of the garden, namely the Brick Path.

Garden urn

On 15th April 2014, the cracks were full of weeds, and the urn had yet to be planted up.

Jackie clearing path

By 21st, Jackie had made considerable progress in eradicating weeds on the urn circle;

Brick radial path intermediate clearanceBrick radial path cleared

and by 30th, made her way along the composite brick section.

Brick path original being cleared

Brick path original cleared

We tackled the older, original length from opposite ends. It was then that Jackie uttered the phrase: ‘Last one to the chimney pot’s a sissy’.

brick-path1

Some of our visitors, such as my Mum, need sticks for walking. These original bricks had become rather uneven over the years, so we asked Aaron to reset them. On 9th August 2015, his friend Lee, the carpenter who had fitted our stair rails, made a start with him. The following week Aaron finished the task alone.

Virginia creeper corner

By this time, the overgrown foliage that had bordered the path on 31st May 2014 had been thinned somewhat.

Verbena bonarensis, clematises and geraniums

Two roses and a Virginia creeper were meant to be supported by a rickety wooden structure, most of which had fallen into the undergrowth. By 14th June that year we had  bought and installed a new Gothic Arch, retrained the existing climbers, and added a couple of clematises.

View from Brick Path

This was the south easterly view from this point by 28th September 2015,

Brick path and owl

by which time the path had mellowed, and an owl had taken up residence in the dead snake bark maple.

Agriframe arch

Beyond the Gothic Arch and nearer the house, Wedding Day, a huge rambling rose, romped confetti-like across the red-leaved Japanese maple and a mature hebe. It needed some special support. We provided this in the form of an Agriframes Gothic Arch, installed on 30th October 2014.

Wedding Day pruned

Even this is insufficient for the prolific climber. It received further heavy pruning on 2nd October 2015.

This evening we dined at the Royal China restaurant in Lymington. Taking the advice of our friendly waitress we halved our order from last time, and just about managed to finish everything. We both drank Tsingtao beer.

The Unidentified Fir Bed

I began the day by watching a recording of the England v. Australia match in the Rugby World Cup. In case there is any rugby fan in either hemisphere who is yet to watch it, I will say no more.

Jackie working on Unidentified Fir bed

Encouraged by yet another warm, sunny, day, Jackie began work on clearing, and settling down for winter, the bed between the Heligan and Phantom Paths. We will call it The Unidentified Fir Bed, in honour of the large evergreen that enhances it. My contribution was to gather up and shift the debris to the respective compost and combustible heaps; to dig out a tree peony that encroached upon the Heligan Path; and to rake up fallen leaves from the gravel.

Unidentified Fir Bed 1Unidentified Fir Bed 2

In addition to releasing a number of choked plants that had not seen the light of day for a year or two, Jackie discovered another row of large rocks, and a length of perished buried hose from an ancient irrigation system.

Hose in Unidentified Fir Bed

Unidentified Fir Bed 3

This afternoon, deciding to dig over the exposed ground, she found much rubble therein. I, oblivious of this added difficulty, watched TV rugby matches between Argentina and Tonga, and between Ireland and Italy.

Owl on stump

Elsewhere in the garden this morning I had discovered yet another owl perched on a stump,

Grass Patch view

and the aerator acquired from the dump yesterday piercing the grass patch. The pheasant and kiwi didn’t look impressed.

Hollyhock

One of Margery’s hollyhocks still stands sentinel to the left of this scene.

Today’s bouquet of roses includes

Rose Laura Ford

Laura Ford,

Rose Festive Jewel

Festive Jewel,

Rose Absolutely Fabulous

and Absolutely Fabulous.

Wall butterfly

Butterflies like this well camouflaged Speckled Wood (thanks to Paul Clarke for pointing out that this is not a Wall Brown) have not yet given up,

Bee on bidens

neither have the slurping bees.

This evening we dined on cod in mornay sauce with broccoli florets; and crisp carrots, cauliflower and cabbage. We both drank Cimarosa Pedro Jimenez 2014.

The Name Of The Rose

Substituting scissors for secateurs, the Head Gardener began the day by cutting my hair. We settled the dispute about how long ago she last performed this pruning, by referring to our customary aide-memoire – this blog. It was 14th March. There were no pestiferous flies to eradicate.

It seemed only fair for me to cut the grass.

Before that, in the dim light penetrating the complete cloud cover, I photographed three of yesterday’s rose purchases.

Roses Mum in a Million and Love Knot

Mum in a Million, yet to be planted, is positioned in front of Love Knot, already ascends its obelisk,

Rose Laura Ford

as does Laura Ford,

800px-LauraFord.ChinaCats.2

named after the contemporary sculptor,

seen here on Wikipedia which tells us that the artist ‘[grew] up in a travelling fairground family to the age of sixteen and attended Stonar School in Wiltshire. [She studied] at Bath Academy of Art (1978–82), whilst spending a term at the Cooper Union School of Art in New York City. She was invited to take part in the annual New Contemporaries at Institute of Contemporary Arts(1982). Ford has lived and worked in London since 1982 since studying at Chelsea School of Art (1982–83).’ She is photographed working on China Cats, commissioned by Shanghai Sculpture Park in 2012.

On the former compost bed

Gladioli etc

The gladioli have opened out;

Echinacea

the echinaceas have taken on their natural pink hue;

Bess on poppy

and pollinating bees vie for position, plundering the remaining poppies.

By this afternoon blooms had appeared on the roses

Hoverfly on rose Summer Wine

Summer Wine, already slaking the thirst of a hoverfly,

Rose Jacqueline du Pre

and Jacqueline du Pre, named after the great cellist.

220px-JacquelinedupredavidoffWikipedia, featuring this photograph of du Pre with her Davidov Stradivarius of 1712, and her husband Daniel Barenboim, has this to say about her:

‘Jacqueline Mary du PréOBE (26 January 1945 – 19 October 1987) was an English cellist. At a young age, she achieved enduring mainstream popularity unusual for a classical performer. Despite her short career, she is regarded as one of the more uniquely talented cellists of the second half of the twentieth century.

Du Pré is most famous for her iconic recording of Elgar‘s Cello Concerto in E Minor, her interpretation of which has been described as “definitive” and “legendary”.[1]

Her career was cut short by multiple sclerosis, which forced her to stop performing at the age of 28. She battled the illness for many years, which ultimately resulted in an untimely death.’

Everyone of my generation will remember her well.

Veronicas and rose Mum in a Million

We completed more planting. Jackie moved the Mum in a Million, and, in honour of her late, beloved mother, flanked it by two Veronicas.

Then came the turn of

Rose Hot Chocolate

Hot Chocolate,

and Rose Gaujard, known until yesterday as lost label. This bears the name of its mid-twentieth century breeder, Jean Gaujard. It was slightly disappointing to learn that there was no-one called Rose for whom the plant was named.

This evening we dined on Jackie’s sublime cottage pie, enhanced by the inclusion of ground cumin and coriander leaves; peas, cabbage, and carrots; followed by profiteroles. My accompaniment was more of the merlot. Jackie had already finished her Hoegaarden.

Afterwards, I made the mistake of watching the highlights of the first day of the Lords Ashes Test Match in which Australia scored 337 runs for 1 wicket. That’s good news if you are an Aussie.