Finding Its Feet

Lidl and Aldi are gaining ground in the war to control England’s Supermarket custom. Their quality is very good and their prices very low. There is no finesse in their layout of goods, and there is no guarantee that an item on sale in the central aisles will be in stock the next day. GeneralContinue reading “Finding Its Feet”

Leaf Compost

The cranking clatter of marauding magpies heard as I walked down Downton Lane on my Hordle Cliff top walk this murky morning, was to give way to that of a mechanical digger in Shorefield on my return. The latter, which was breaking up the concrete bases of the demolished chalets, could be heard from the beach.Continue reading “Leaf Compost”

Is This Orlaigh? 2

After I had walked down to the postbox and back, the rain set in for the day. I amused myself scanning more of my loose negatives, viz. fifteen from the summer of 1982. That year water pistols were all the rage, and Sam was delighted to be introduced to them by Matthew and Becky inContinue reading “Is This Orlaigh? 2”

Schnittlinie

Yesterday’s steady rain changed to showery weather today. One rainfall soaked us as we ran from the car to Molly’s Den; another kept us in the car when, after the Den shopping trip Jackie and I drove down to Barton on Sea. The return visit to Molly’s was in search of some Victorian glasses for Shelly’sContinue reading “Schnittlinie”

Piquant Cauliflower Cheese

This morning I finished reading the preface to Madame Bovary. I hadn’t realised that Flaubert’s now acclaimed novel once enjoyed the limelight, like ‘Lady Chatterley’s Lover’ by D.H. Lawrence, more than a century later, of an indecency trial before being published in book form. Lawrence’s mediocre novel was first published privately in Venice in 1928. NotContinue reading “Piquant Cauliflower Cheese”

Death Of The Brown Velvet Suit

Yesterday I mentioned my mother’s postwar ingenuity.  Not just making all our clothes, but manufacturing her own toilet paper.  Of necessity, her squares cut from knitting patterns were not very comfortable, but they were at least strong, and did the job once you had done yours.  We are now inundated with numerous brands of thisContinue reading “Death Of The Brown Velvet Suit”

History Comes At A Price

When the whole row of checkouts in a supermarket begins to reject any credit or debit cards that are inserted into the machines at the counters, chaos ensues.  We know, because we shopped in Totton’s Lidl this morning.  Our prospective purchases were all laid out on the conveyor belt.  The man in front only hadContinue reading “History Comes At A Price”

I Had Just Won The Lottery

Today it was time for a big shop. In this instance that meant a trip to Totton for Lidl and Asda.  On the way we diverted to Copythorne to recce a house in Copythorne Crescent.  The house looked good.  It was down a narrow unmade road with hedgerows alongside fields opposite.  In one field aContinue reading “I Had Just Won The Lottery”

IKEA 3 (R18)

On this clear, cold, and sunny morning I took yesterday’s walk in reverse. Smoking chimneys enlivened the line of the horizon.  Distant cattle lowed; cocks crowed; steam rose from one sunlit ditch whilst a blackbird spuddled in another; the occasional cyclist whirred, and the occasional car sped, past.  Otherwise it was just me and the ponies.Continue reading “IKEA 3 (R18)”

Prolixity Or Concision?

Early this morning I finished reading Robert Graves’ ‘Count Belisarius’, which, I have to say, I found rather heavy going.  I know enough about Roman history to admire Graves’ research and his knowledge of Belisarius’ successful conquests of the Goths, the Vandals, and the Persians; and his relief and defence of Rome during the reignContinue reading “Prolixity Or Concision?”